• Bridgewater Mills, 1807

      1807
      Historic map showing a portion of the Niagara River and a section of land near the Fort Erie reserve on the British side of the river. Oriented with north to the right, as indicated by a compass arrow. Eddy and current speeds are noted on the Niagara River. Old and new ferry routes are shown from Black Rock in the United States across the river to the British side are shown. Also indicated on the British side are handwritten points of interest along the river, including various inn’s, stores, and dwellings. Mills, a dam and an old mill race are labelled. The entrance to Lake Erie is labelled to the south.
    • Fort Erie as left by the Enemy

      Samuel Romilly (1814)
      This historical map of Fort Erie is noted to have been “enclosed in Romilly’s letter to Lieutenant General Drummond, dated Chippawa 10 Nov 1814”. (This notation is taken from Library and Archives Canada therefore it is possible that the letter itself is in their possession). Samuel Romilly’s title was Captain Royal Engineers. The letter describes the conditions of the fortifications after a battle (during the War of 1812). The map itself is dated 11 Nov 1814.
    • Fort Erie, Bertie, plan of Military Reserve

      W. T. Renwick; Anthony Reynolds Vyvian Crease (1852)
      Historical map created for the Buffalo Railroad Company in 1852 to outline a proposed new railroad in Fort Erie, which would cut through military reserve land. Text below the title reads: “Land applied for by the Brantford & Buffalo Railroad Company coloured yellow and green 2368 feet in length. Line of proposed railroad marked in yellow across the reserve. Part coloured green applied for by Mr. Thomson for the purposes of extending his mill race & other improvements."
    • Fort Erie, C.W.

      S. Freeth; Alex Gordon; J. Nightingale; Henry Vavasour (1850)
      Historic map showing the Fort Erie Military Reserve in 1850. Explanatory text below the title is as follows: “Plan of the Military Reserve, showing all the Houses thereon, and the quantity of land attached to each, Etc., as called for by Colonel Vavasour’s Order dated 19th November 1850.” Below this text is a reference chart which lists occupant names, the quantity of land they owned and a description of the buildings on the property. It is noted that the information came from a survey completed in December 1850. Further, a memorandum provides more detailed information about the plan.
    • Map of part of Canada West shewing the Niagara & Detroit Rivers Railway

      1858?
      Historical map showing boundary, road and transportation features.
    • Map of part of the Niagara River and place of the proposed harbour at Black Rock

      Historical map showing ferry crossings, pier, canals, Fort Erie, US side indicates upper and lower village of Black Rock. Geographic coverage from Lake Erie to Squaw Island. Digital reproduction of map (7 1/4 x 12 in.) in National Map Collection. Library and Archives Canada. Georeferenced and modified from NMC Map number 3173 by Map, Data & GIS Library, Brock University.
    • No. 13 Fort Erie, Plan of the Military Reserve - Content called 1000 acres

      Henry Vavasour; R. I. Pilkington; J. G. Kelly (1851)
      Historic map showing a portion of Bertie Township and the Military Reserve at Fort Erie. North is oriented to the top. Lake Erie is shown at south as well as the mouth of the Niagara River. Lots and concessions are shown in Bertie Township, some of which are numbered. The Ruins of Fort Erie and Snake Hill are shown along the bank of the Niagara River. A Mill is also shown near Waterloo. Black Rock Pier extends from the southern tip of Squaw Island towards Lake Erie. On the American side of the river, to the east, locations of military fort sites, Erie Canal, railways, a light house and a sea wall are labelled. Buffalo & Black Rock Harbour is on the east side of Black Rock Pier. Map is signed by authors: “Henry Vavasour, Col. Com'g Rl. Engineers, Canada, 26 October, 1850. R.I. Pilkington, Draftsman." Text in the bottom right corner reads: “Drawn in Lithogy by J. G. Kelly and printed at the Lithog. Establishment Quarter Master Generals Department, Horse Guards. February 1851.”
    • Plan and Section of a Ship Canal from Lake Erie to the Niagara River at the Village of Waterloo

      Thomas Roy (1837?)
      Historic map showing an area of land in Fort Erie, extending to the Village of Waterloo. North is oriented to the top right. A ship canal is shown from Fort Erie to the Village of Waterloo running adjacent to Lake Erie and the Niagara River. Rapids are noted in the Niagara River as are characteristics of the river bottom and soundings. Fort Erie, military lines and other buildings can be seen along the canal and Snake hill is shown at the south. Military reserve land is marked as are military boundary lines. The Erie Canal and a railroad from Buffalo to Blackrock are shown on the American side of the Niagara River.
    • Plan of a Canal between Fort Erie and Waterloo

      Thomas Roy (1837)
      Historic map showing an area of land in Fort Erie, extending to the Village of Waterloo. North is oriented to the top right. A ship canal is shown from Fort Erie to the Village of Waterloo running adjacent to Lake Erie and the Niagara River. Rapids are noted in the Niagara River as are characteristics of the river bottom and soundings. Fort Erie, military lines and other buildings can be seen along the canal and Snake hill is shown at the south. The Erie Canal and a railroad are shown on the American side of the Niagara River.
    • Plan of British Attack on Fort Erie, 1818

      Elias Walker Durnford, 1774-1850.; A. Walpole (1818)
      Historic map showing Fort Erie and various notations regarding military lines, battles and fortifications. North is oriented to the right. The Niagara River is located east of the land shown on the map, however it is not labelled. The military Fort Erie is shown slightly west of “Gov’ Wharf” and the Niagara River. A line running south from Fort Erie is labelled “American Lines”. Notations at the north side of the map indicate the location of an “English Attack” and two Battery’s. A blockhouse is shown at west near the location of the English attack. There are multiple notations written on the map, including: "Royal Engineers' Drawing Room, Quebec. 31st Jan. 1818, A. Walpole, Rl. Engrs." In the bottom right corner and signatures of the authors. Forested areas and vegetation are shown and relief is shown with hachures.
    • Plan of Fort Erie, Town & Military Reserve

      William Wallace, 1805-1887; Alex Gordon (1853)
      Historic plan showing Fort Erie where the Niagara River meets Lake Erie. North is oriented to the right. Military Reserve land is shown along with the ruins of the old military fort. An ordnance boundary line is indicated. The Brantford and Buffalo Railroad line is shown running from the west boundary line toward the Niagara River. A small portion of the town is divided into three lots numbered 1 to 3. Some buildings are shown along the shore of the river but only a mill and ferry wharf are identified. Relief is shown by hachures. The plan is signed by William Wallace, Engineer, and a notation below the scale reads: “Forwarded with my report of 1st February 1853. Alexr. Gordon Lt. Col. Royal Engineers.” Plan bears the stamp of the Office of Commanding Royal Engineers.
    • Plan of Military Reserve Land and Proposed Military Fort at Fort Erie

      1794?
      Historic plan showing military reserve land in Fort Erie which sits north of Lake Erie. A plan of the fort is shown which includes design and measurements of the fort walls along with buildings within the fort. Military land south of the fort is shown broken into lots and numbered. The measurements are shown in chains. More buildings are shown right on the shore of Lake Erie, one of which is labelled: “Kings Store House”. A road is shown running east to west and is labelled: “Road to Chippewa”. A cross-section diagram of the military line of Fort Erie is shown at the top of the plan. The plan bears the stamp of the Inspector General of Fortifications. Written in the top right corner is: “G. M. No. 41 1794”.
    • Plan of the Attack made upon Fort Erie (Upper Canada) by the Right Division of the British Army, under the command of Lt. Genl. Drummond in August and Septr. 1814.

      G. Nicolls; George Phillpotts (1815)
      Historic plan showing a portion of land in Fort Erie, bordered in the south by Lake Erie and east by the Niagara River. North is oriented to the bottom. At the south of the map Fort Erie is shown along with military lines/entrenchments and roads. Toward the north is an area of cleared land labelled: “The encampment of the British Army.” North of the encampment is another portion of cleared land labelled: “The Park of Artillery". The large majority of the map is forested. Two lines are shown in the Niagara River running from the river to a military location labelled: “No. 1 Battn.”. The southern-most line reads: “from Battery between Black-Rock and Buffaloe about 1500 yards.” and the line that is north of that reads: “from Black-Rock Battery. about 1700 yards.” Number 2 and Number 3 Battalions are shown south of the number one battalion. Plan is signed by the authors. Relief shown by shading and hachures.
    • Plan of the Country round Fort Erie shewing the entrenchments etc. thrown up by the enemy in August 1814

      Philip Hughes (1814)
      Historic plan showing the military Fort Erie and surrounding forested area. North is oriented to the right. Lake Erie, although not labelled, is located east of Fort Erie. The military Fort Erie is shown with the two barracks in red ink. Multiple other buildings line the banks of the Niagara River, however only the wharf is labelled. Snake Hill is shown at south and forested land is shown surrounding the fort. Sections of the plan are labelled with letters which correlate to the reference key index located in the top right corner of the map. References indicate that some sections of the plan refer to military action during the War of 1812, including; “Entrenchments thrown up by the Enemy connecting Fort Erie & Snake Hill”, and “Abbatis made by the Enemy round 1st (?) positions.” Some portions of the key are illegible. The plan is signed: “Position the 8th Aug. 1814 Php. Hughes (?) Rl. Eng.” Text written in the bottom right corner reads: “With a letter to Lt. Genl. Mann dated Montreal 7 Oct. 1814”. Relief is shown by hachures.
    • Plan of the Niagara Frontier. 1937

      Putnam, A. E. (A. E. Putnam, 1937)
      Map showing the Canadian Niagara Power Company electric line and planning service areas.
    • Plan of the operations of the British Army, in front of Fort Erie, in the Months of August & Septembr., 1814 under the Command of Lieutenant General Sir Gordon Drummond, Knight Commander of Bath &c. &c.

      W. A. Nesfield; Geo. D. Cranfield (Kingston, Ont., 1815)
      Historical map showing Fort Erie as it was when taken by the Americans. North is oriented to the bottom left. It depicts additional works raised by the American Army, Major Buck's Rd, and roads cut by the British Army. A British Camp is located north of Fort Erie. The map also shows entrenchments, fortifications, batteries and picquets, as well as, the position of troops. The Niagara River and Squaw Island are clearly marked. Black Rock is labelled on the American side of the river. Reference information is provided below the title. Relief shown by shading and hachures.
    • Plan of the situation of Fort Erie with the New Works & Buildings proposed

      Gother Mann, 1747-1830| (1803)
      Historic plan showing the ruins of the original military Fort Erie and the plan for a new proposed fort. North is oriented to the right. Text beside the title reads: “Vide Report of this Date”. It is also signed by the author: “Submitted by Gother Mann Col. Command. Rl. Engr. Quebec 1st Aug’t. 1803.” Lake Erie is shown east of Fort Erie. Shown west of Lake Erie and East of the “Road to Chippeway & Falls” is the ruins of military Fort Erie, King’s Store, Merchant’s Store and a Wharf. An unlabeled roadway extends from the “Road to Chippeway & Falls” to the location of a proposed fort. Within the confines of the fort walls there are six buildings shown, which include: two barracks, quarters for officers, storehouses, magazine and a guard house. Inset at the bottom of the map is a section of the proposed works. Scales are provided for both the plan and the section. Relief is shown by shading.
    • Plan shewing the Situation & Dimensions proposed for building Lots for Merchants & Traders on the King’s reserved Land at Fort Erie in the Province of Upper Canada

      Gother Mann, 1747-1830; James Green; Robert Prescott (1798)
      Historic plan showing a portion of Fort Erie including King’s reserved land and military Fort Erie. North is oriented to the right and the Niagara River is shown at east, but not labelled. Military Fort Erie and a store house are shown on the bank of the Niagara River. South of the fort the land is divided into lots and are identified by number or by land owners name. The plan is signed by authors: “Gother Mann Col. Commd. Rl. Engr. Quebec 30th June 1798” and “By order of the Commander in Chief (Signed) James Green (?) Secry”. The plan was also signed by Robert Prescott which marks it as being approved. Relief is shown by shading.
    • Sketch showing the situation of Fort Erie and position of forces for the attack by the British

      J. B. Glegg (1814)
      Historical map of Fort Erie showing the area from Snake Hill past the military Fort Erie and the British lines to the headquarters of Lieutenant General Drummond further north. North is oriented to the bottom and Lake Erie is shown to the south. The Niagara River is shown to the east. The Indian camp, camp and artillery park, picquets, trails, and fortifications by the British are depicted. There is some detail of the American border and its military defenses.
    • The Buffalo, Depew and West Seneca power district. 1906

      Ontario Power Company (1906)
      Sheet 5 of "Maps of power districts in Niagara Region" Digital reproduction of map (73 x 77 cm.) Georeferenced and modified by Map, Data and GIS Library, Brock University