• Rock of Ages, Niagara, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1902)
      The description reads "(11) American Falls and "Rock of Ages" - Niagara, U.S.A."
    • Horseshoe Falls, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1902)
      The description reads "(13) Tireless Niagara - Horseshoe Falls, from above, - U.S.A."
    • Ice and Snow, Niagara Falls, U.S.A.

      American Stereoscopic Co. (1903)
      The description of the image reads "514-a-A fairy-land of ice and snow, Niagara Falls, U.S.A.".
    • View of Falls from Steel Bridge, Niagara, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1903)
      The description of the image reads "(4)-8972-General view of Falls from new steel bridge - Maid of the Mist at landing - Niagara, U.S.A." The reverse of the image includes the description, "We are standing on the new steel bridge over Niagara River, 190 feet above the water and looking a little west of south, up the river towards Lake Erie. The high cliff at the extreme left, on the American side, is Prospect Point, where a crowd is gathered at this moment to view the Falls that we see just beyond Prospect Point. That dark, tree-covered mass of rock beyond is Goat Island; and just this side of Goat Island we see a bit of its precipice has been cut off separate from the rest by the powerful current of the waters - the smaller portion is Luna Island, and the Luna Falls go pouring down between the two islands. The face of the precipice curves inward beneath the Luna Falls leaving behind the 160 foot sheet of water the unearthly hollow known as the Cave of the Winds. Beyond Goat Island we see the gigantic curve of the Horseshoe Falls, 3,010 feet long and 158 feet high, reaching around through the clouds of spray to the farther Canadian shore. (The boundary line between British and American territory is in mid-stream.) It has been estimated that every minute 375,000 tons of water pour over these Horseshoe Falls, and they are wearing away the cliffs, moving back up the stream at the rate of 2.4 feet per year. It was probably only about a thousand years ago that they took their plunge just about where we stand now. Down there below us, at the wharf is the Maid of the Mist at the American landing taking on passengers who have come down the steep bank by the inclined railway. Its course takes it through those clouds of spray almost to the very foot of both Falls, - waters falling from 167 feet overhead, and water surging at least as many feet deep under the staunch little vessel. See special 'keyed' maps of Niagara pub. by Underwood and Underwood, also the Niagara Book by Mark Twain, W.D. Howells and others."
    • Glass stereo card - View of Horseshoe Falls

      1954
      A glass stereo card with a view of the Horseshoe Falls. The caption on the card reads "1954. Vue du Niagara, Etats-Unis, Amerique " which translates to "1954. View of Niagara, United States of America".
    • Glass stereo card - the American Falls from the Canadian side with a water wheel in the foreground

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A glass stereo card of the American Falls from the Canadian side with a water wheel in the foreground.
    • Glass stereo card - Five figures in ‘Sunday Best’ clothing at Prospect Point

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A glass stereo card of five figures in ‘Sunday Best’ clothing at Prospect Point with the Canadian and American Falls in the background.
    • Glass stereo card - Whirlpool Rapids with a train crossing the suspension bridge above

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A glass stereo card of Whirlpool Rapids with a train crossing the suspension bridge above.
    • Glass stereo card - Table Rock by the brink of the Horseshoe Falls

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A glass stereo card of Table Rock by the brink of the Horseshoe Falls.
    • Glass stereo card - The Gorge and Horseshoe Falls below Table Rock

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A stereo card of the gorge and Horseshoe Falls below Table Rock in winter.
    • Glass stereo card - Horseshoe Falls in winter

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A glass stereo card of Horseshoe Falls in winter.
    • Glass stereo card - Table Rock by the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in winter

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A glass stereo card of Table Rock by the brink of the Horseshoe Falls.
    • Glass stereo card - Thomas Clark Street’s pagoda tower on Cedar Island

      McPherson, J. (ca. 1861)
      A glass stereo card of Thomas Clark Street’s pagoda tower on Cedar Island showing Niagara Falls in the background.
    • Prospect Point, Niagara Falls

      Griffith & Griffith (Circa 1900)
      The description on the image reads "Free Niagara, Prospect Point, Niagara Falls".
    • The Horse Shoe Fall

      E. & H.T. Anthony & Co. (n.d.)
      The description on the reverse states "The Majesty and Beauty of Niagara. The Horse Shoe Fall." There is also a No. associated with the card, but the original printed number (5800_01) has been crossed out and replaced in ink with 5795.
    • Winter at base of American Falls

      Realistic Travels Publishers (n.d.)
      The description for the image reads "Niagara in winter, huge bank of frozen water below the American Falls. The beginning of the ice-bridge".
    • American Falls, Niagara From Goat Island

      n.d.
      The description below simply states "116 American Falls, Niagara From Goat Island".
    • The Rapids, Niagara

      n.d.
      The description of the image reads "No. 115 - The Rapids, Niagara - From the Terrapin Tower". On the reverse it reads "The Rapids, Niagara, From the Terrapin Tower (taken instantaneously). From this commanding point of view the rapids are seen to great perfection - the Tower standing just on the edge of the Horse-shoe Fall. Some idea of the rapidity with which these waters hurry onward to the mighty abyss may be formed from the fact that the river descends nearly fifty-one feet in a distance of three-quarters of a mile. Gathering force as they approach nearer the edge of the Falls, they dash and foam amid the rocks which speck their surface, and with torturous writhes dash onward with a fury grand and beautiful in the extreme. Whole flocks of water-fowl have often been seen going to destruction among these rapids. Pleased with being carried by the stream, they have indulged in the pleasure till the rapidity of the current has rendered it impossible for them to rise and thus have they been carried down and washed over the Fall. At one time during the months of September and October, sufficient quantities of dead water-fowl have been found every morning below the Fall to afford ample subsistence for the garrison at the fort. The bodies of bears, deer, and other animals have also been found."
    • Frozen Niagara Falls

      Keystone View Company (n.d.)
      The image is described in German. It appears to be Niagara Falls frozen in winter with many tourists and onlookers at the base.
    • Ice Mountain Niagara Falls, U.S.A.

      H.K.S.L., London (n.d.)
      The description of the image reads "No. 65 - The great ice mountain and American Falls, Niagara".