• Maid of the Mist, Niagara Falls, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1901)
      The image is described as "(5) 'Maid of the Mist' - Nymph of the mighty cataract, Niagara Falls, U.S.A.".
    • Maid of the Mist, Niagara, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1901)
      The description of the image is "(6) Majestically Grand - the Falls from the 'Maid of the Mist,' Niagara, U.S.A.". The reverse of the image reads "You are on the deck of the small but sturdy little steamer that runs along near the foot of the falls. At this moment you are pretty nearly mid-stream, looking south. The American shore are up over your left shoulder. That tall, dark cliff at the extreme left of what you see is Goat Island. The people up there outlined against the sky look like dolls and no wonder; they are more than 160 feet above your head. Some of them are looking off over the unspeakable grandeurs of the Horseshoe Fall there at the right; some are without doubt looking down at the very boat and remarking that the passengers look like dolls. It is an awesome experience to go so near that never-ceasing downpour of waters from the sky. The air is full of the roar and iridescent spray, and it seems as if the boat must be drawn in under the overwhelming floods never to rise again. Yet, curiously enough, the river right around the boat is not so madly excited as you might expect. It seems more like some great creature, dazed, bewildered, stunned by some incredible experience and not yet quite aware of what has happened. (When it gets down into the Whirlpool Rapids, two miles below here, it is dramatically alive to its situation!) The gigantic curve of the cliffs, reaching in up-stream straight ahead, makes a contour line of over 3000 feet before it comes up against the Canadian banks on the west (right). Geologists say that the Falls ages ago must have been at least seven miles farther down the river (behind you) and have gradually won their way back. Even now the curve of the Horseshoe is worn away from two to four feet in a year. No wonder; 12, 000, 000 cubic feet of water (about 375, 000 tons) sweep over the rocks in one minute, and the same the next minute and the next and the next. See Niagara through the Stereoscope, with special maps locating all the landmarks about the Falls.
    • Man at Base of Niagara Falls

      n.d.
      The image shows a man standing at the base of Niagara Falls.
    • Men at Falls

      n.d.
      A group of six men standing by the Falls.
    • The Monteagle House

      n.d.
      The reverse of the card reads "The Monteagle House, Suspension Bridge, Niagara Falls".
    • The New Suspension Bridge

      Curtis, George E. (n.d.)
      The card reads "308 - The New Suspension Bridge". There is a man standing on the bridge.
    • New Suspension Bridge & Elevator Tower

      Barker, Geo. (n.d.)
      The card reads "847 - New Suspension Bridge - Niagara - 1268 feet long". The image shows the "Elevator Tower" and a large group of people walking through the base of the tower.
    • New Suspension Bridge & Tower

      n.d.
      The card reads "New Suspension Bridge, Niagara Falls".
    • The New Suspension Bridge and Falls

      Curtis, George E. (n.d.)
      The card reads "322 - The new suspension Bridge and Falls". The image shows a man in the foreground and the suspension bridge in the background.
    • New Suspension Bridge, 1268 feet long

      n.d.
      The card reads "New Suspension Bridge, 1268 feet long"
    • Niagara Falls

      Allgem. Deutscher Kunst-Verein (n.d.)
      The image is produced by a German publisher and the description simply states "Der Niagarafall".
    • Niagara Falls (Image from Eastern District of Pennsylvania Clerks Office)

      Langenheim, F. (1854)
      The caption below reads "Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1854 by F. Langenheim in the Clerks office of the district Court for the Eastern district of Pennsylvania".
    • Niagara Falls from Elevator Tower

      Curtis, George E. (n.d.)
      The description below the image reads "225 Niagara Falls from Elevator Tower, New Suspension Bridge".
    • Niagara Falls from Prospect Point

      Keystone View Company (n.d.)
      The description of the image is written in German and mentions Prospect Point and the American Falls. There is also a number listed, V23281.
    • Niagara Falls from Prospect Point to Horseshoe Falls

      Realistic Travels Publishers (n.d.)
      The description of the image reads "Magnificent outlook over Niagara, world's grandest waterfall, from Prospect Point to Horseshoe Falls". The side of the card is also stamped "By Royal Command to Their Imperial Majesties King George V and Queen Mary".
    • Niagara Falls, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1901)
      The image is described as "(8) Nature's Everlasting Smile, Niagara Falls, U.S.A."
    • Niagara from the distant Tower, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1902)
      The image is described as "(7) Niagara and its great cloud of rising Spray - from the distant tower, U.S.A.".
    • Niagara Guide looking into Cave of the Winds - Niagara Falls, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1901)
      The description reads "(10) An old Niagara Guide - looking into the awe-inspiring Cave of the Winds - Niagara Falls, U.S.A.".
    • Niagara in Winter

      Anthony & Co, E. & H.T. (n.d.)
      The card description reads "Niagara in Winter. General view of the Falls from Point View." No. 63
    • Prospect Point Crowd, Niagara, U.S.A.

      Underwood & Underwood (1901)
      The description of the image reads "(2) Admiring Tourists viewing the Falls, from Prospect Point, Niagara, U.S.A."