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dc.contributor.authorLackey, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-23T18:59:57Z
dc.date.available2015-01-23T18:59:57Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/6024
dc.description.abstractSherlock Holmes has been one of the most-adapted characters in literature since his first appearance in A Study in Scarlet in Beeton's Christmas Annual in 1887. Each new adaptation must offer innovations that bring freshness and contemporary appeal to time-worn stories and concepts or risk irrelevancy; analyzing these changes closely sheds light on shifts in societal constructs. Taking this as a starting point, this thesis examines Sherlock and Elementary from a perspective of feminism and queer theory via methods of discourse and genre analyses, with texts ranging from 1931 to the present as objects of comparison. The research illuminates constructions of masculinity as they have changed over time, particularly the movement from an orderly, stable, rational construction of hegemonic masculinity to one that is chaotic, often violent, and anti-heroic in at least some aspects while still being invested in the status quo.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectSherlock Holmesen_US
dc.subjectAdaptationsen_US
dc.subjecttelevisionen_US
dc.subjectmasculinityen_US
dc.subjectgenreen_US
dc.titleGender and Genre in 21st Century Visions of Sherlock Holmesen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Popular Cultureen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopular Culture Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.embargo.termsNoneen_US


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