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dc.contributor.authorOu, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-16T19:12:53Z
dc.date.available2014-12-16T19:12:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/5949
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the practice and implementation of undergraduate student internships in Ontario, Canada. A literature review revealed that implementation of internships at the undergraduate level in Ontario varies within campuses by faculty and department and also across the university spectrum, partly due to a lack of consistency and structure guiding internship practice in Ontario. Moreover, a lack of general consensus among participating stakeholders concerning the philosophy and approach to internship further complicates and varies its practice. While some departments and universities have started to embrace and implement more experiential learning opportunities into their curriculum, the practice of undergraduate internships is struggling to gain acceptance and validity in others. Using the theory of experiential learning as presented by Dewey (1938) and Kolb (1984) as theoretical frameworks, this research project developed an internship implementation strategy to provide structure and guidance to the practice of internships in Ontario’s undergraduate university curriculum.en_US
dc.subjectExperiential Learningen_US
dc.subjectWork-integrated learningen_US
dc.subjectHIgher Educationen_US
dc.subjectInternshipsen_US
dc.titleExperiential Learning: Creating Meaningful Opportunitiesen_US


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