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dc.contributor.authorDrolet, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-12T14:50:37Z
dc.date.available2014-12-12T14:50:37Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/5947
dc.description.abstractDespite general endorsement of universal human rights, people continue to tolerate specific human rights violations. I conducted a two-part study to investigate this issue. For Part I, I examined whether people tolerated torture (a human rights violation) based on the morality and deservingness of the target. Participants tolerated torture more when the target had committed a highly morally reprehensible transgression. This effect was mediated by the target’s perceived deservingness for harsh treatment, and held over and above participants’ abstract support for the right to humane treatment. For Part II, hypocrisy induction was used in an attempt to reduce participants’ toleration of the torture. Participants were assigned to either the hypocrisy induction or control condition. Unexpectedly, participants who tolerated the torture more in Part I reduced their toleration the most in the control condition, possibly because of consistency and floor effects. Limitations and implications of the findings are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectdeservingnessen_US
dc.subjecttortureen_US
dc.subjecthuman rightsen_US
dc.subjecthypocrisyen_US
dc.subjectcognitive dissonanceen_US
dc.titlePerceived Deservingness and the Toleration of Human Rights Violations: The Problem and a Possible Solutionen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Psychologyen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.embargo.termsNoneen_US


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