• Association of Functional Screening Tests and Noncontact Injuries in Division I Women Student-Athletes

      Warren, Meghan; Lininger, Monica R.; Smith, Craig A.; Copp, Adam J.; Chimera, Nicole J. (Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2020)
      To determine the association between functional screening tests and lower-body, noncontact injuries in Division I women basketball, soccer, and volleyball student-athletes (SA). Sixty-eight injury-free women SA (age19.1 ± 1.1 years, height171.3 ± 8.7 cm, and mass68.4 ± 9.5 kg) were tested preseason with single hop (SH), triple hop (TH), and crossover hop (XH) for distance, and isometric hip strength (abduction, extension, and external rotation) in randomized order. The first lower-body (spine and lower extremity), noncontact injury requiring intervention by the athletic trainer was abstracted from the electronic medical record. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to determine cut-points for each hopping test from the absolute value of between-limb difference. Body mass–adjusted strength was categorized into tertiles. Logistic regression determined the odds of injury with each functional screening test using the hopping tests cut-points and strength categories, adjusting for previous injury. Fifty-two SA were injured during the sport season. The cut-point for SH was 4 cm (sensitivity = 0.77, specificity = 0.43, and AUC = 0.53), and for TH and XH was 12 cm (sensitivity = 0.75 and 0.67, specificity = 0.71 and 0.57, AUC = 0.59 and 0.41, respectively). A statistically significant association with TH and injuries (adjusted odds ratio = 6.50 [95% confidence interval1.69–25.04]) was found. No significant overall association was found with SH or XH, nor with the strength tests. Using a clinically relevant injury definition, the TH showed the strongest predictive ability for noncontact injuries. This hopping test may be a clinically useful tool to help identify increased risk of injury in women SA participating in high-risk sports.
    • Does bracing affect bone health in women with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis?

      Akseer, Nasreen; Kish, Kimberly; Rigby, W Alan; Greenway, Matthew; Klentrou, Panagiota; Wilson, Philip M; Falk, Bareket (BioMed Central, 2015)
      Purpose: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is often associated with low bone mineral content and density (BMC, BMD). Bracing, used to manage spine curvature, may interfere with the growth-related BMC accrual, resulting in reduced bone strength into adulthood. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of brace treatment on BMC in adult women, diagnosed with AIS and braced in early adolescence. Methods: Participants included women with AIS who: (i) underwent brace treatment (AIS-B, n = 15, 25.6 ± 5.8 yrs), (ii) underwent no treatment (AIS, n = 15, 24.0 ± 4.0 yrs), and (iii) a healthy comparison group (CON, n = 19, 23.5 ± 3.8 yrs). BMC and body composition were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Differences between groups were examined using a oneway ANOVA or ANCOVA, as appropriate. Results: AIS-B underwent brace treatment 27.9 ± 21.6 months, for 18.0 ± 5.4 h/d. Femoral neck BMC was lower (p = 0.06) in AIS-B (4.54 ± 0.10 g) compared with AIS (4.89 ± 0.61 g) and CON (5.07 ± 0.58 g). Controlling for lean body mass, calcium and vitamin D daily intake, and strenuous physical activity, femoral neck BMC was statistically different (p = 0.02) between groups. A similar pattern was observed at other lower extremity sites (p < 0.05), but not in the spine or upper extremities. BMC and BMD did not correlate with duration of brace treatment, duration of daily brace wear, or overall physical activity. Conclusion: Young women with AIS, especially those who were treated with a brace, have significantly lower BMC in their lower limbs compared to women without AIS. However, the lack of a relationship between brace treatment duration during adolescence and BMC during young adulthood, suggests that the brace treatment is not the likely mechanism of the low BMC.