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dc.contributor.authorMcEachern, Tamara
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-09T19:54:36Z
dc.date.available2013-10-09T19:54:36Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/5047
dc.description.abstractHandwriting is a functional task that is used to communicate thoughts using a written code. Research findings have indicated that handwriting is related to learning to read and learning to write. The purposes of this research project were to determine if a handwriting intervention would increase abilities in reading and writing skills, in graphomotor and visual-motor integration skills, and improve the participants’ self-perceptions and self-descriptions pertaining to handwriting enjoyment, competence, and effort. A single-subject research design was implemented with four struggling high school students who each received 10.5 to 15.5 hours of cursive handwriting intervention using the ez Write program. In summary, the findings indicated that the students showed significant improvements in aspects of reading and writing; that they improved significantly in their cursive writing abilities; and that their self-perceptions concerning their handwriting experience and competence improved. The contribution of handwriting to academic achievement and vocational success can no longer be neglected.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjecthandwriting interventionen_US
dc.subjectliteracyen_US
dc.subjectcursive writingen_US
dc.subjectadolescenceen_US
dc.subjectsingle-subject research designen_US
dc.titleHandwriting Intervention: Impact on the Reading and Writing Abilities of High School Studentsen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Child and Youth Studiesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Child and Youth Studiesen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.embargo.termsNoneen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-02T02:15:56Z


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