• Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 17 November n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-11-17)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, November 17 n.d. In the letter, Ethelwyn discusses some correspondence that Frank Page may be using for his books. The letters she discusses are those of Mrs. Watson (wife of Homer Watson), presumably to be added to Page's book.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 18 September 1932

      1932-09-18
      The letter to Frank Page discusses the hardship of the loss of her brother Herbert, it reads: "Dear Frank, Your sympathy and that of dear Elsie, was a real comfort to me in the hardest trial I have had to face. The feeling that has pursued me ever since the tragedy that all life is concentrated in one black mental picture intensified by every passing train and that all else is mere chattering and muttering - this feeling is beginning to give way to a sense of right proportion and a gradual return to the normal. Everyone has been most kind. Here is a case in point: At the inquest the jury brought in a verdict of suicide. But Mr. ------, a lwayer in Welland, demurred. 'Oh no", he said, "no, when a man of sound mind deliberately decides to destroy himself- that is suicide. But this is a case of irresponsible actions. No more guilt attaches to the victim than if he were a two-year-old child, straying ignorantly on the railway track.' Was it that the very kindest thing that could have been? The heavy sense of loss and the merciless publicity have been hard to bear, but I have many happy memories - Herbert never said an unkind word to one in his life, nor gave me an unkind look. When he turned against everyone else he clung to me - my poor boy! The night before he left us he seemed quieter than usual and I stopped beside his chair on my way to bed and said 'Good night, Herbert' He gave me a look of full recognition (a rare experience) put my hand against his cheek and said 'Good night, Agnes, good night, good night.' I kissed him and went on up to bed. I never saw him again; for I could not look at his dreadfully disfigured face and head. Dear Jean and Margaret have been most kind. They were here last Friday and we had such a pleasant evening together. So many letters keep coming everyday. Some from complete strangers with a few words of keen sympathy. For the first time in many years I have no nervous invalid to care for; nothing to dread; no wakeful nights of apprehension and distress. Already I feel the benefit of relief from anxiety. I gained three pounds last week. Do forgive all this about myself. It is a relief to write it. And believe me, Sincerely your friend, Ethelwyn Wetherald"
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 19 October 1936

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1936-10-19)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 19 October 1936. Ethelwyn remarks on the work of Mr. Page that she been editing. She gives a couple of notes via the letter to let him know how the proofreading is going.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 2 March 1939

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1939-03-02)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 2 March 1939. The letter discusses a foreword written by Wetherald for the "soon to appear book of poems" by Clara Bernhardt. She also mentions the request of Page to write a review for his upcoming book.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 2 September 1932

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1932-09-02)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Mr. Page, 2 September 1932. The letter reads: "Dear Mr. Page, - Thank you so much for these lovely pictures. I take great pleasure in them. It was a disappointment, not seeing you this summer; but I expect to do so before next May. I am coming up to New Dundee next April & expect to celebrate my 76th birthday at your hospitable house. Ellen will show me the lovely Park in your vicinity; & you & Elsie & I will enjoy 'one crowded hour of glorious chat'. Here is a funny experience I had recently. My health had been poor all summer, no pain, nothing organic - just tired all the time. It was partly the heat, partly anxiety about Charlie & Herbert, & fussing about money matters. Nothing coming in (it never does on a farm in April, May & June, & so much going out. But as the summer is nearly over, & my mind is settled about my brothers, & Ken brings home from market $15 to $25 each time & goes twice a week, I felt that I ought to pick up. Dorothy asked Ken to guess how much I weighed & he said 90 & she said 'less', he shouted 'No! Well, she's got to got to the Falls tonight sure.' There is a Belgian herb doctor there who is a wizard with 'yarbs.' The little man (he barely reaches Ken's shoulder) looked me over & said, 'what is the trouble?' 'Bronchial cough. Had it since last winter.' 'Then you are very weak.' I can't wobble across the room without hanging on to chairs & tables & I pull myself upstairs by the use of the stair rail. 'The stomach?' 'n.a. Can't eat anything. Worse when take drugs.' 'Dear lady, why do you take drugs? Now listen. You have eggs?' 'Oceans of them' 'Take one fresh egg & poach it very soft. Butter a square of brown bread toasted, & put the egg on it. You have milk?' 'Barrels of it' 'Good. A large tall glass of new milk. That makes one meal. You have fruit & vegetables?' 'Acres of them' 'And chickens?' 'Hundreds of them' 'Then why do - how can you get sick? Chicken breast or chicken broth with fruit & vegetable for the other two meals no pie, no cake, no sugar, no dessert, no, no, no! Now listen: one table spoonful from this big bottle before meals. 30 drops of the Life Elixr at bedtime. But if you feel tumbly & collapse, then 30 drops at once.' Kenneth said, 'This lady is a writer'. 'Ha!' he struck his breast. 'Me, I am a writer too. I have a $2 book. He brought it. 'The True Story of Hiawatha.' Some book my next will be $3. We smiled. Brother & sister under the skin. That was last Saturday Today I weigh 82. I shall surely go to 90 in a month. Feel fine. Affectionate regards Ethelwyn Wetherald"
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 20 May 1932

      Page, Frank (1932-05-20)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Mr. Page, 20 May 1932. The letter reads: "It was a pleasure to get your card at Mothers' Day, & I shall try to deserve your compliment. Did you know that Mazo de la Roche (Winner of the ten thousand dollar prize, offered by the Atlantic Magazine for her novel "Jalna") has adopted recently a boy of five & a girl of two years. She is in England this summer but her house in Toronto. I wish every unmarried or childless woman could follow her example & make this world a happier place. It was most kind of you to send me such a good description of Homer Watson and his work. Of course I had known him by reputation but that was enough to give your appreciation great interest. How you & dear Elsie must have enjoyed your visit with him last Wednesday Mr. & Mrs. Louis Blake Duff called for me & took me with them to visit Walter McRaye who lives at Grimsby & whose fame as a reader and entertainer is known not only on this continent, but in England where he gave recitals with Pauline Johnson. He has a wonderful voice - with great range & richness of tone. He is an enthusiast over poetry & read to us poems of Roberts, Bliss Carmen, Wilson MacDonald, Edwin Markham & many many others. He has wonderful collections of treasures, rare books, pictures, autographs of a host of noted people. There was a picture & autograph of the recently assassinated President of France with his five sons - splendid young fellows, four of them killed in the war. Mr. McRaye has a lovely little fruit farm - plums, cherries, peaches and apples - three acres of bloom. I should think he is in his fifties, though he has that clear English complexion that never looks jaded. Your third favor is the poem on Spring, which I read with pleasure. My favorite stanzas are the third and fifth, but all the verses give the worshipful feeling of a walk in the spring woods. Yes, I think "Here seek the joy of a - new found birth" is preferable to the other line. Of course the prevailing influence of the woods in peace. You remember Emerson interpreting the woods as saying to a man fresh from a political meeting "why so hot, my little sir"? But in Spring every new leaf & flower rejoices. Mr. John Garvin was here last Sunday, & we called on the Duffs in their lovely place at St. John's. Forty years ago Mrs. Duff (then Georgina Somerville) attended his school when he taught in Welland - & he slapped her hands for misbehavior! Well, he didn't slap them this time; far otherwise. Do let me know when you are next in Pelham. We want you & Elsie & Ellen here for a good visit. My love to them. Sincerely Ethelwyn Wetherald"
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 20 September n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-09-20)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 20 September n.d. Ethelwyn has sent a copy of her writing for review by Frank Page. She says "Please tell me all its faults of omission and commission. There must be several as I have just rushed it off, and the rule for self criticism is to keep a poem six weeks and then inspect it."
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 21 March n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-03-21)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 21 March n.d. Mr. Page has sent Ethelwyn some photographs, she describes them as "the loveliness of woods and fields..." She mentions that she cannot come in person to see them, "I have never given up the hope of visiting in your home some day, but at present, with my invalid brother here, it is quite impossible for me to leave home."
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 22 April n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-04-22)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 22 April n.d. Ethelwyn mentions the book that Frank Page is working on and comments a "picture of Homer Watson in the Millar book".
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 24 March n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-03-24)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 24 March n.d. Ethelwyn recounts stories of her father cutting down trees as a boy in Rockwood and discusses how "surely do the deep woods bring out all the poetry in on'es nature." Included in the letter is a "Christmas Toast to a Happy Warrior" which reads "Here's to a fellow that's earning his crown, And daily, invisibly wears it; Here's to a fighter who, when he's cast down, Laughingly, wittily bears it; Here's to a man from his head to his shins, Making a jest of his bruises; Here's to Our Friend, who is great when he wins, And shrinks not an inch when he loses. "Adapted from 'Toast to a Happy Warrior' by H.J. Phillips in New York Sun"
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 25 September n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-09-25)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Mr. Page, 25 September n.d. Ethelwyn mentions that she has received some photographs of herself and others from Mr. Page. She also discusses that Mr. Page will be working on a Who's Who essay on The Khan.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 26 December n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-12-26)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, December 26 n.d. Ethelwyn has received a notebook and samples of Van Gogh's art from the Page family. She wishes the family a Happy New Year.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 26 June n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-06-26)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, June 26 n.d. The letter mentions bonds purchased by Ethelwyn's brother Herbert before he died. Ethelwyn asks for advice as to whether to sell the bonds and if Frank Page is willing to aid with the sale.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 27 July 1937

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1937-07-27)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 27 July 1937. Included in this letter, Ethelwyn writes that she received "two shares of class A preferred stock in Maple Leaf Milling Company". She also mentions that she is "endlessly obliged" to Page for the work he has done in order for Ethelwyn to receive the shares.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 27 October n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-10-27)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, dated only October 27. Ethelwyn describes a difficult Summer with peach prices quite low. She also mentions that Mr. Page is continuing on with his book and offers her assistance with the process.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 29 April n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-04-29)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 29 April n.d. Ethelwyn remarks that they have never had a phone and that she uses Carson Dilts' phone "on the next road above" if they require any messages be sent to anyone.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 29 December 1935

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1935-12-29)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Mr. Page, 29 December 1935. In the letter, Ethelwyn thanks the Page family for a book of poetry she received from them. She also mentions a visit by Louis Black Duff where she received a book called "Under Tow" by "that true genius and insufferable egotist, Wilson McDonald".
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 29 July n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-07-29)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, July 29 n.d. Ethelwyn mentions the book that Frank Page is working on about Homer Watson. Ethelwyn also states that she still cannot lift her left foot from the bed, but her knee is moving better now.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 30 December 1939

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1939-12-30)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 30 December 1939. Ethelwyn writes that she has received a couple of books from Mr. Page and thanks him for his generosity. She also mentions Mr. Page's book about Homer Watson and the several people she knows who are enjoying the read.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 31 January n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-01-31)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 31 January, no year provided. The letter reads: "Dear Frank, These are interesting chapters you send me & I am beginning to understand, more & more clearly, why you wish to put your impressions of Homer Watson's life on record. It's because you were privileged to see part of his nature - his richly humor nature - that others, apparently have ignored or have not see. I shall read the chapters carefully again, for several changes that might be suggested & return the longer one later in the week. Just at present it is '[illegible] in upon me', as the Quakers say, that perhaps it would be as well to omit all reference to Oscar Wilde's moral character. It is quite within your rights, of course, to say what you do, but veiled references what the curiosity of young or half educated readers & perhaps the truest charity would be to direct attention simply to his intellectual powers. Are you sure you have Wylie Grier's name correctly spelled? I have never seen it other than Wylie Grier. As an index of character I know of nothing better than what people laugh at, so I shall take pleasure in reading again your very interesting account of Mr. Watson's sense of Humor. Meantime I envy your ability to work brain & muscle both. Don't overdo. Ever your fellow craftsman Ethelwyn."