• Illustration - Drawing of Pig while Blindfolded, 23 July 1900

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (2013-05-23)
      The illustration of a pig is part of an autograph book collection of Ethelwyn Wetherald. Her guest book consists of drawings of pigs her guests create while blindfolded. The signature of each guest accompanies the illustration.
    • Illustration - Drawing of Pig while Blindfolded, C.E. Long

      1900-08-21
      The illustration of a pig is part of an autograph book collection of Ethelwyn Wetherald. Her guest book consists of drawings of pigs her guests create while blindfolded. The signature of each guest accompanies the illustration. This illustration was done by C.E. Long, 21 August 1900.
    • Illustration - Drawing of Pig while Blindfolded, Dorothy Wetherald

      1933
      The illustration of a pig is part of an autograph book collection of Ethelwyn Wetherald. Her guest book consists of drawings of pigs her guests create while blindfolded. The signature of each guest accompanies the illustration. This illustration was done by her adopted daughter, Dorothy Wetherald.
    • Illustration - Drawing of Pig while Blindfolded, Evelyn Cox

      n.d.
      The illustration of a pig is part of an autograph book collection of Ethelwyn Wetherald. Her collection consists of drawings of pigs her guests create while blindfolded. The signature of each guest accompanies the illustration. This illustration was done by Evelyn Cox.
    • Illustration - Drawing of Pig while Blindfolded, Marie J. Oldroyd

      n.d.
      The illustration of a pig is part of an autograph book collection of Ethelwyn Wetherald. Her guest book consists of drawings of pigs her guests create while blindfolded. The signature of each guest accompanies the illustration. This illustration was done by Marie J. Oldroyd.
    • Illustration - Drawing of Pig while Blindfolded, Marie M. Barker

      n.d.
      The illustration of a pig is part of an autograph book collection of Ethelwyn Wetherald. Her collection consists of drawings of pigs her guests create while blindfolded. The signature of each guest accompanies the illustration. This illustration is by Marie M. Barker.
    • Illustration - Drawing of Pig while Blindfolded, Vera Hambly

      n.d.
      The illustration of a pig is part of an autograph book collection of Ethelwyn Wetherald. Her guest book consists of drawings of pigs her guests create while blindfolded. The signature of each guest accompanies the illustration. This illustration was done by Vera Hambly.
    • Letter - A.N. Moyer to Samuel Moyer, 6 December 1896

      Moyer, A.N. (2013-05-22)
      A letter written from A.N. Moyer to his brother Samuel Moyer in the year 1896. A.N. Moyer states that he is returning to his brother a collection of poems by Wetherald. He recounts his early years in Pelham after reading the poetry by Wetherald.
    • Letter - Bliss Carman to Ethelwyn Wetherald, 15 Decemer 1897

      Carman, Bliss; Carman, Bliss (2013-05-24)
      A letter from William Bliss Carman to fellow poet Ethelwyn Wetherald in the year 1897. Carman mentions other Canadian poets, Lampman and Roberts, and his "regret" that he cannot stay in closer contact with his fellow Canadian poets. Carman was born in Fredericton in 1861, but spent most of his life in the United States. He was known as a great Canadian poet, but also a famous American poet.
    • Letter - Earl Grey (Sir Albert Henry George Grey) to Ethelwyn Wetherald, 2 January 1909

      Grey, Earl (2013-05-22)
      A letter from Earl Grey (Sir Albert Henry George Grey) Governor General of Canada to Wetherald discusses her 1907 publication The Last Robin: Lyrics and Sonnets.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald "Nan Nan" to Miss Dalrymple, 16 February 1920

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1920-02-16)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Miss Dalrymple, 16 February 1920. The letter reads: "Dear Miss Dalrymple, Thank you so much for the kind letter received a few days ago. Sometimes I feel like apologizing for the magazines I send you. I wanted to send some Ladies' Home Journals but the stories were too mushy, though the pictures were beautiful. The People's Magazine I enclosed a week ago seems to me perfectly worthless, except for one admirable article by Frank Crane. I like "Life", though some things in it jar me, but it's editorials are generally good and level-headed. If I ever send you things that you have no time and little taste for, please send them on to anyone you think might care for them. As for "The Little Lame Prince" I thought it was the least I could do to send for a fresh copy when I made such a failure of mending the old one. I am sorry I have no Last Robins here at present but I will send for some before long. Talk of prophets having no honor in their own country! I think some alleged poets have too much honor. I hope sometime to bring out a book of children's verses (I enclose a few samples) and the first copy that comes from the publisher shall be addressed to you who have done so much for my little girl. Dorothy says she will bring home a book of Eugene Field's from the school library. I shall be glad to see it as I have always greatly admired his work. Now if you will forgive me for intruding on your scanty leisure with an over-lay letter I should like to explain my attitude toward my favorite brother, who has been ill so long. Sam has always lived on his nerves; he has always been too high strung, too sensitive, too prone to worry if the least little thing went wrong. His health has broken down again and again and he knows all that hospitals and sanitoriums can do for him. We have had so many happy times together. Have spent three winters in Florida, one in California, and many shorter trips to Washington, Philadelphia and Atlantic City. When he was paymaster on the Great Northern R'y he used to take me with him so far as Devil's Lake, and I have countless other pleasures to thank him for. We have so many tastes in common that it is a privilege to me to have him here. I know several people who think it must be a strain on me, but the real strain would come if he were in some sanitorium, pining for a familiar face and voice. On days when he is feeling better he talks so entertainingly and plays little games with Dorothy, and when he is at his worst I know that his right place is here with me. I never thought of it as a "duty" ____ and I know I don't deserve all the credit I get. Ever sincerely yours Dorothy's Nan Nan
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank and Elsie Page, 26 November n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-11-26)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank and Elsie Page, November 26 n.d. Ethelwyn mentions that the Page family had visited Walter McRaye and they had brought "Carl and Madonna along." She mentions that "Walter is at his best in social life with congenial friends around him he simply shines and his cousin is a Pearl indeed."
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page and Family, 29 April n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-04-29)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page and family, 29 April n.d. She mentions that she received happy birthday wishes and a painting from the Page family. Ethelwyn also discusses an article by W.A. Deacon congratulating her on her achievements as a well respected Canadian and shared her address. She has since received several letters, including one from Marshall Saunders "who lives in Toronto, and whose book 'Beautiful Joe' was translated into every important language in the world."
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, "Friday"

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (n.d.)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page with no date provided. She writes "Thank you for your very kind & sympathetic letter. I'm sure I am a little stranger though I still have a great dread of seeing people. I do hope this will wear off as it makes life miserable. Walter McRaye quotes 'My orders are to fight,' which is a neat and clever comeback. But no doctor depends on his own medicine to keep him well or cure him when ill. Thank you again. Love to all. Ever Sincerely Ethelwyn"
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, "Monday"

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (n.d.)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, simply dated "Monday". Ethelwyn describes a "misery" she has been suffering from, but states "it's not as bad as last year". She also writes "News of the World is not very cheering, but it can't be that the fate of civilization is in the hands of a mad man."
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 1 February 1939

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1939-02-01)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Mr. Frank Page, 1 February 1939. The letter discusses the heavy amount of snow that has come and the difficulty travelling the roads. She mentions that Page's book about Homer Watson is soon to arrive and that Dorothy is currently in Cornwall.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 1 January 1934

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1934-01-01)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Mr. Page, 1 January 1934. The letter thanks the Page family for the Christmas gifts and describes a visit with Walter McRaye.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 10 May n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-05-10)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 10 May n.d. In the letter, Ethelwyn remarks that Walter McRaye had called Frank Page's book 'better than I had expected." She mentions that he does not often give compliments, so his remark should be appreciated. She also mentions that Walter's book on Pauline Johnson has not made it into print and she says "I don't believe it will ever come out." She discusses another author, Clara Bernhardt and her encouragement for Bernhardt's book of poems.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 10 October n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-10-10)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 10 October n.d. In the letter, Ethelwyn writes "...I enjoyed the idea of having my poem on Homer Watson at the end of your book." She discusses a plan to get her poem in a magazine quickly so that it will be pushed forward to be used in Page's book. She refers to Edgar Allan Poe and his process of sending his poetry to every editor he knew.
    • Letter - Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 13 January n.d.

      Wetherald, Ethelwyn (nd-01-13)
      A letter from Ethelwyn Wetherald to Frank Page, 13 January n.d. Ethelwyn mentions that Dorothy is spending most of her time with Charlie and that "he is equally devoted to her. The consciousness of her happiness keeps my heart glowing." She also states that a family friend had come and stayed for a few days. Ethelwyn discusses that she cannot "walk more than 20 minutes at a time but have no pain."