• Article - "Corsets again"

      Thistlethwaite, Bel; Wetherald, Ethelwyn (n.d.)
      Another article by Ethelwyn Wetherald under the pseudonym Bel Thistlethwaite focused on corsets and the harm they can cause to girls/women. The article is followed by a response from "A Devotee of the Corset". Wetherald then replies "To the Devotees of Corsets".
    • Article - Woman's World "The Right Not to Vote"

      Thistlethwaite, Bel; Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1888-06-16)
      An article from the column Woman's World by Ethelwyn Wetherald under the pseudonym Bel Thistlethwaite. The article discusses a woman's right to vote, Wetherald writes "It is always easier to leave things are they are than to make changes in them. That is what slave-owners said before the American civil war; -and no doubt many of the slaves were more comfortable than they were after they had gained their freedom. Granting that most of the colored population were satisfied with their old social status, and that most women are contented with their present restricted liberties, that does not affect the righteousness of the emancipation movement. But it is said that women should not inerfere in man's sphere. Very well, then let man see to it that he does not interfere in woman's sphere. One of the most powerful unintentional arguments in behalf of woman suffrage that I ever red was contained in a poem called 'Divorced,' under which ran the lines, 'Custody of the child given to the father.' To the father! But the law will never be just to women until women have a share in the making of it."
    • Article - Woman's World: "A word on Woman Suffrage"

      Thistlethwaite, Bel; Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1888-06-05)
      An article from the column Woman's World written by Ethelwyn Wetherald under the pseudonym Bel Thistlethwaite. The article makes an argument for the equal rights of women as Wetherald states "From the discovery that she is a thinking, reasoning being, it is but a step to the knowledge of her rights and duties as a citizen and to her perception of the fact that those who are equally bound to submit to laws should have an equal voice in the construction of those laws. Why should not women instead of men be the sole makers of the laws which control both sexes? Is it because woman's place is in the home and family? It may be affirmed quite as emphatically that man's place is in the shop or on the farm. The duties we owe to the State are only second in importance to those we owe to our households. Every family has or should have the benefit of maternal as well as paternal wisdom. But how is it with our country? It is pretty thoroughly fathered; some of its fathers could easily be dispensed with - at least there are rumors to that effect. But it has never yet been mothered."
    • Article - Woman's World: "Advice to an Engaged Girl"

      Thistlethwaite, Bel; Wetherald, Ethelwyn (1888-05-28)
      An article written in the Woman's World column by Ethelwyn Wetherald under the pseudonym Bel Thistlethwaite. She discusses the type of men that a girl should marry and those she should avoid. She also mentions that you should like the person before you love them. She also discusses not rushing marriage, "Don't let any one hurry you into marriage. You are an independent young woman now - something you can never be again after you are merged - or submerged - in husband and home. The novelists write "finis" at the wedding-day because it is then that the reign of prose begins."
    • Article - Woman's World: "Pecuniary Dependents"

      Thistlethwaite, Bel (?-11-15)
      An article in the Woman's World column written by Ethelwyn Wetherald under the pseudonym Bel Thistlethwaite. The article discusses the role of women once married and no longer a wage-earner. She states "Every feminine wage-earner is worthy of honor, but the work of not one is worthy to be compared in importance with the work of that noblest and greatest of all the world's workers - the loving, loyal wife and mother. In her hands is the destiny of her children, and in their hands is the destiny of the nation. All honor be to her! All honor - and a little ready money!"