• From Academic to Personal: Addressing Asianness in Ontario Education

      Louie, Monica
      This study explored the complexities of Asian Canadian experiences in educational spaces. In particular, I considered how various stereotypes and discourses of Asianness contribute to an environment in which Asian students are rendered both privileged and marginalized, seen and unseen, supported and excluded. Current research on Asian Canadians reveals a limited understanding of the intricacies of Asian experiences in educational settings. Moreover, attention to the particular needs of this group is often not considered in policies designed to address racial and ethnic equity in schools. Using an autobiographical approach, I explored and analyzed four personal vignettes to gain perspective into my experience of racial stereotypes, prejudices, and discrimination. I framed this project using Asian Critical Theory to discuss how my identity developed as a female Chinese Canadian student and teacher in Ontario. I used these stories, alongside theory and literature, to interrogate the relevance, applicability, and utility of equity and inclusive practices in teaching. Throughout, I ask how the racialized discourses and stereotypes around Asianness inform my identity as an Asian Canadian.
    • “Keep It 100”: A Handbook Promoting Equitable Outcomes for Black University Students Through Mentorship

      Adebo, Michael
      Black and racialized students attend Canadian universities with the intent of achieving academic success. However, instances of overt and covert racism negatively impact Black and racialized students’ academic success and retention rates in university programs. Lee (1999) and Sinanan (2016) suggest mentorship as a key strategy towards increasing academic success and retention rates among Black students. This handbook proposes mentorship strategies for use by university educators and administrators to help build beneficial relationships with Black and racialized students that lead to improved learning outcomes. Specifically, this handbook proposes what Quach et al. (2020) have identified as mentee-focused mentorship. Mentee-focused mentorship centres on the needs of Black students and recognizes the layers of systemic racism that exist in universities. This project provides educators and administrators with an understanding of concepts related to systemic racism, anti-racism, intersectionality, critical race theory (CRT) and CRT-informed practices. Personal stories from Black students collected from the academic literature are presented alongside points of reflection for educators and administrators. Points of reflection are provided with the intent that readers will meaningfully consider their positions of power and the strengths in students’ non-academic identities.