• Dramatic Arts and the Inclusion of Students With Intellectual Disabilities in Secondary School: A Self-Study of My Transformative Experience With the Third Period Thespians

      Hussey, Amber
      This self-study explored my transformative experience with the Third Period Thespians (3PT) program, which created a theatre performance with a combination of students from a mainstream drama classroom and a segregated classroom with students with intellectual disabilities. In particular, I considered how and why this experience was transformative through arts-based methods. Notably, reflecting on experiences before, during, and after my time with the program and creating art in the form of monologues, stream of consciousness, and paintings to demonstrate that self-reflection process. Through these art-based methods I found that my past experiences were fairly limited in regard to involvement with people with intellectual disabilities in the classroom. During my time with 3PT I found that my beliefs shifted to be more inclusive, marked by hesitation at the beginning of the program to acceptance and embracing inclusive classrooms after my experience. In conclusion, that my time with 3PT was a transformative experience because it incorporated inclusive classroom practices that had been absent in my previous experiences.
    • An Exploration into Effective Practices for Implementing Project-Based Learning (PJBL) in an Integrated, Elementary Mathematics Curriculum

      Varga, Jessica
      This qualitative study explored how elementary school teachers negotiate common challenges associated with the implementation of project-based learning (PJBL) when enacting this strategy in an integrated, mathematics and science project. Based on an extensive literature review, 6 challenges associated with PJBL were identified. These include transforming teacher and student roles, learner readiness, motivation and engagement, group dynamics and collaboration, authenticity, and assessment. A case study methodology was used in which qualitative data were collected from an interview with 1 elementary school teacher who facilitates PJBL in an integrated, mathematics curriculum. Based on the data analysis of this study, the strategies discussed can be divided into 3 major themes: providing general facilitation guidelines for PJBL, promoting a growth mindset, and facilitating the development of process skills. The results of this case study offer insight and recommendations for elementary teachers who are implementing PJBL in their context and provide elementary and novice teachers with a number of suggestions and strategies to optimize their success when implementing PJBL in an integrated, mathematics curriculum for the first time.
    • Foster Children in Education: Resource Handbook for Elementary Educators

      Zmiyiwsky, Mira Anna (2014-01-13)
      This project is aligned with examining the role of the education system and the foster care context on the learning experiences of young children in the classroom. This project is a study of the literature and research conducted on the life experiences, adverse effects of these experiences (such as attachment disorder), socioemotional development, and resiliency of foster care children. Furthermore, the project explores the literature on how the experiences of these foster children traverse contexts and impact the education setting. This study also outlines specific strategies and practices for teachers and school staff in order to promote students’ resiliency, competency, behaviour management, and overall educational success and positive academic experience. These strategies resulted from a critical review of the literature and translated into the development of an informative handbook intended for teachers. The handbook developed in this study focuses on the understanding of the lives of foster care children, their histories, adverse experiences, socioemotional development, strategies to manage behaviour, unique needs, and encouraging their resiliency and success in school. To ensure the soundness of the handbook, 2 education liaisons at a Family and Child Services agency within Ontario and a former child and service social worker from Manitoba reviewed the first draft and provided comments on the validity of the content and the potential usability of the handbook for educators. Suggestions and comments provided by these experts were used to enhance the final product of the handbook.
    • Multiculturalism, Neoliberal Education Policies and its Effect on the Black Youth in Ontario Schools

      Ali, Fauziyatu
      Multiculturalism in Canada is a significant policy which aims at finding unity in diversity and aimed at dismantling discriminatory attitudes and cultural jealousies. The Multiculturalism Act, which was passed in 1971 by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau was set within a bilingual framework making Canada the first country in the world with an official multicultural policy. This encouraged various provinces to have some forms of multicultural policies, with Ontario creating one in 1977. With multiculturalism becoming a key aspect of Canadian culture, having some form of multicultural education was necessary. In this research, I explain how neoliberal education policies set by various governments in Ontario hinder the realization of having some form of multicultural education. Neoliberal educational reforms downplay structural & institutionalized sources of inequality as it neglects the social realities of students of color by way of marginalizing and excluding their cultural realities from the curriculum. Aside this, I also examine the challenges faced by the black youth in the Ontario education system. Among some of the challenges faced include racial discrimination and stereotypes, the lack of representation of Black/African perspectives in the school curricula, the absence of Black teachers, and a prevailing culture of White dominance. This research concludes by providing ways that we can re-imagine the Ontario education system to create a more inclusive and equitable learning environment.
    • Negotiating Education 'Inside and Out': A Feminist Analysis of Educational Programming for Previously Incarcerated Women in Canada

      Sitnik, Valentina
      In this Major Research Paper (MRP), I report on findings from a literature review I conducted on educational programs available to women who have been incarcerated in Ontario, Canada. I use a feminist lens to analyze literature and program documents to understand the educational opportunities available to women who are facing the challenge of reintegration into communities, after incarceration. Specifically, I examine transitional programs offered by Correctional Services Canada, the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services (Ontario), and other key prison programs. I also review various programs offered to women upon release, through the John Howard Society (Ontario), The Elizabeth Fry Society (Ontario), the Walls to Bridges Program (Ontario), the Canadian Family Correctional Network, and the Ontario Halfway Housing Association. In this review, I explore the processes of stigmatization and criminalization that inform women’s educational programming opportunities. I also highlight various gendered challenges and barriers that influence women’s access to, and experience of, educational programming post-release. My goal is to identify the state of existing educational programs for women who have been previously incarcerated and to generate discussion for future program development.
    • The Role of Community Partnerships in the Support of Postsecondary Students From Refugee Contexts

      Simon, Drew
      This qualitative study sought to identify how postsecondary institutions and non-profit organizations can work together to best support the needs of students from refugee contexts, particularly at a time when global refugee migration is high (UNICEF, 2016). A review of literature revealed that refugee and international students may face many challenges when transitioning to a new country and educational environment, and that postsecondary institutions can take steps to help ensure such students’ success. The study took place in two geographical areas in Southern Ontario in close proximity to one another. Fifteen individual interviews were conducted, each lasting an average of approximately 35 minutes, with staff and administrators from postsecondary institutions and non-profit organizations to develop an understanding of the services they have in place to support the needs of students from refugee contexts and what they feel would help them better support this group. Findings indicate that although there is a lack of services specific to students from refugee contexts being offered in the postsecondary sector, many services are offered for newcomers more generally. It was found that there is some collaboration between postsecondary institutions and non-profit organizations in support of newcomers, but there is also a desire for more. Participants in this study shared insights about how they can be supported in their goal to deliver effective programming to newcomers. The study concludes by offering a series of recommendations on how postsecondary institutions can work with non-profit organizations to better support students from refugee contexts.
    • Sex and education?: Intersecting sex, education, and student activism

      Yap, Iris
      With a focus on the Eurocentric sex education curriculum, this paper reviews three sub-disciplinary geographic literatures – geographies of education, geographies of sexualities, and geographies of children and youth – with a focus on student activism. I propose that although these dissimilar areas of work are relatively sequestered, they share a common connection, children and youth agency. Through a detailed exploration of these three literatures, this study found three things. First, an inclusive sex education curriculum is important as it has the ability to dismantle harmful heteronormative discourses while providing a safe and inclusive environment for marginalized students. Secondly, school’s and education's purposes are contradictory as they have been used as a way to protect children, but also to prepare them for the responsibilities of adulthood. Lastly, although children and youth are often viewed as incapable of making rational and informed decisions by adults, they are active agents in their everyday lives. They, therefore, are capable of creating social and political change. These findings add to the continuing conversations of these three sub-disciplinaries of geography. They also repeat the call for more research into the combination of these three sub-disciplinary fields to dismantle the hegemonic heterosexual norms.