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dc.contributor.authorHakimi-Rezaei, Javaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-28T18:11:07Z
dc.date.available2010-01-28T18:11:07Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-28T18:11:07Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/2886
dc.description.abstract. The influence of vine water status was studied in commercial vineyard blocks of Vilis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Franc in Niagara Peninsula, Ontario from 2005 to 2007. Vine performance, fruit composition and vine size of non-irrigated grapevines were compared within ten vineyard blocks containing different soil and vine water status. Results showed that within each vineyard block water status zones could be identified on GIS-generated maps using leaf water potential and soil moisture measurements. Some yield and fruit composition variables correlated with the intensity of vine water status. Chemical and descriptive sensory analysis was performed on nine (2005) and eight (2006) pairs of experimental wines to illustrate differences between wines made from high and low water status winegrapes at each vineyard block. Twelve trained judges evaluated six aroma and flavor (red fruit, black cherry, black current, black pepper, bell pepper, and green bean), thr~e mouthfeel (astringency, bitterness and acidity) sensory attributes as well as color intensity. Each pair of high and low water status wine was compared using t-test. In 2005, low water status (L WS) wines from Buis, Harbour Estate, Henry of Pelham (HOP), and Vieni had higher color intensity; those form Chateau des Charmes (CDC) had high black cherry flavor; those at RiefEstates were high in red fruit flavor and at those from George site was high in red fruit aroma. In 2006, low water status (L WS) wines from George, Cave Spring and Morrison sites were high in color intensity. L WS wines from CDC, George and Morrison were more intense in black cherry aroma; LWS wines from Hernder site were high in red fruit aroma and flavor. No significant differences were found from one year to the next between the wines produced from the same vineyard, indicating that the attributes of these wines were maintained almost constant despite markedly different conditions in 2005 and 2006 vintages. Partial ii Least Square (PLS) analysis showed that leaf \}' was associated with red fruit aroma and flavor, berry and wine color intensity, total phenols, Brix and anthocyanins while soil moisture was explained with acidity, green bean aroma and flavor as well as bell pepper aroma and flavor. In another study chemical and descriptive sensory analysis was conducted on nine (2005) and eight (2006) medium water status (MWS) experimental wines to illustrate differences that might support the sub-appellation system in Niagara. The judges evaluated the same aroma, flavor, and mouthfeel sensory attributes as well as color intensity. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminate analysis (DA). ANOV A of sensory data showed regional differences for all sensory attributes. In 2005, wines from CDC, HOP, and Hemder sites showed highest. r ed fruit aroma and flavor. Lakeshore and Niagara River sites (Harbour, Reif, George, and Buis) wines showed higher bell pepper and green bean aroma and flavor due to proximity to the large bodies of water and less heat unit accumulation. In 2006, all sensory attributes except black pepper aroma were different. PCA revealed that wines from HOP and CDC sites were higher in red fruit, black currant and black cherry aroma and flavor as well as black pepper flavor, while wines from Hemder, Morrison and George sites were high in green bean aroma and flavor. ANOV A of chemical data in 2005 indicated that hue, color intensity, and titratable acidity (TA) were different across the sites, while in 2006, hue, color intensity and ethanol were different across the sites. These data indicate that there is the likelihood of substantial chemical and sensory differences between clusters of sub-appellations within the Niagara Peninsula iiien_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectWine and wine making--Ontario--Niagara Peninsula.en_US
dc.subjectTerroir--Ontario--Niagara Peninsula.en_US
dc.subjectViticulture--Ontario--Niagara Peninsula.en_US
dc.titleDelineation of within-site terroir effects using soil and vine water measurement. Investigation of Cabernet Francen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.namePh.D. Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Mathematics and Scienceen_US


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