• Data mining using L-fuzzy concept analysis.

      Saha, Sajal; Department of Computer Science
      Association rules in data mining are implications between attributes of objects that hold in all instances of the given data. These rules are very useful to determine the properties of the data such as essential features of products that determine the purchase decisions of customers. Normally the data is given as binary (or crisp) tables relating objects with their attributes by yes-no entries. We propose a relational theory for generating attribute implications from many-valued contexts, i.e, where the relationship between objects and attributes is given by a range of degrees from no to yes. This degree is usually taken from a suitable lattice where the smallest element corresponds to the classical no and the greatest element corresponds to the classical yes. Previous related work handled many-valued contexts by transforming the context by scaling or by choosing a minimal degree of membership to a crisp (yes-no) context. Then the standard methods of formal concept analysis were applied to this crisp context. In our proposal, we will handle a many-valued context as is, i.e., without transforming it into a crisp one. The advantage of this approach is that we work with the original data without performing a transformation step which modifies the data in advance.
    • Object Classification using L-Fuzzy Concept Analysis

      Addison, George Tsekpetse; Department of Computer Science
      Object classification and processing have become a coordinated piece of modern industrial manufacturing systems, generally utilized in a manual or computerized inspection process. Vagueness is a common issue related to object classification and analysis such as the ambiguity in input data, the overlapping boundaries among the classes or regions, and the indefiniteness in defining or extracting features and relations among them. The main purpose of this thesis is to construct, define, and implement an abstract algebraic framework for L-fuzzy relations to represent the uncertainties involved at every stage of the object classification. This is done to handle the proposed vagueness that is found in the process of object classification such as retaining information as much as possible from the original data for making decisions at the highest level making the ultimate output or result of the associated system with least uncertainty.