• Adult education and academic libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (EmeraldInsight, 2018)
      Abstract Purpose – The purpose of this review is to offer practicing academic librarians an overview of adult education theories as a way to more deeply understand and further foster adult learning in academic libraries. Design/methodology approach – This article is a literature review. Findings – This review introduces academic librarians to a range of specific adult education learning theories, it offers examples of academic library users engaging in these types of adult learning, it considers how academic libraries can further foster adult learning, and it identifies major characteristics of adult learners. Originality/value – This literature review offers a summative overview of adult education in a way that has not appeared in the library literature to date, along with explicit connections between adult education theories and academic library practices.
    • Adult learning theories and autoethnography: Informing the practice of information literacy

      Bordonaro, Karen (Sage, 2020-03)
      The learning theories of self-directed learning and lifelong learning can inform the practice of information literacy in higher education for adult learners. These theories lend themselves to the use of autoethnography, a research methodology that relies on the exploration of lived experiences through reflexivity informed by theory. In conducting an autoethnography on information literacy, its practice appears as both a singular and a collective activity. Multiple ramifications for practice come from this exploration. These ramifications include considerations of choices, barriers, conducive learning environments, informal learning opportunities, and the need for reflection for adult learners. Applying the learning theories of self-directed learning and lifelong learning to the practice of information literacy offers librarians new and useful perspectives on its practice with adult learners.
    • Automatic Preparation of ETD Material from the Internet Archive for the DSpace Repository Platform

      Ribaric, Tim (2009-11-23)
      A big challenge associated with getting an institutional repository off the ground is getting content into it. This article will look at how to use digitization services at the Internet Archive alongside software utilities that the author developed to automate the harvesting of scanned dissertations and associated Dublin Core XML files to create an ETD Portal using the DSpace platform. The end result is a metadata-rich, full-text collection of theses that can be constructed for little out of pocket cost.
    • Book Review: Pirate Cinema

      Ribaric, Tim (2600 Enterprises, Inc., 2013)
      Book Review of 'Pirate Cinema' written by Cory Doctorow.
    • Book Review: Rabbits

      Ribaric, Tim (2600 Enterprises, Inc., 2021)
      Book Review of 'Rabbits' written by Terry Miles.
    • Bridging the business data divide: insights into primary and secondary data use by business researchers

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (International Association for Social Science Information Services & Technology, 2015-09)
      Academic librarians and data specialists use a variety of approaches to gain insight into how researcher data needs and practices vary by discipline, including surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Some published studies included small numbers of business school faculty and graduate students in their samples, but provided little, if any, insight into variations within the business discipline. Business researchers employ a variety of research designs and data collection methods and engage in quantitative and qualitative data analysis. The purpose of this paper is to provide deeper insight into primary and secondary data use by business graduate students at one Canadian university based on a content analysis of a corpus of 32 Master of Science in Management theses. This paper explores variations in research designs and data collection methods between and within business subfields (e.g., accounting, finance, operations and information systems, marketing, or organization studies) in order to better understand the extent to which these researchers collect and analyze primary data or secondary data sources, including commercial or open data sources. The results of this analysis will inform the work of data specialists and liaison librarians who provide research data management services for business school researchers.
    • Business data: issues and challenges from the Canadian perspective

      Lowry, Linda; Hong, Eun-ha (IASSIST, 2008-08-15)
      This paper explores the issues and challenges that we have faced as Canadian academic business librarians when working with business data. As this is an exploratory study, we hope only to start a discussion among data librarians about some key challenges facing the academic community related to supporting the teaching and research use of business data. Our paper begins with a brief discussion of general data trends, followed by a detailed exploration of business data trends and trends in Canadian business education. We discuss challenges and issues related to working with business data from both the collections and reference service perspectives, including the pros and cons of providing business data services and support within the library environment. We conclude by suggesting some measures that both academic business librarians and data librarians can take to address some of these challenges.
    • C

      Ribaric, Tim (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016-06)
      This is chapter 8 of "The Librarian's Introduction to Programming Languages" entitled C. It introduces the C language in a context suitable for Librarians and information professionals.
    • Collegial Self-Governance for Professional Librarians: A Look at the Advantages of the Establishment of a Library Council and its Role in the Lives of the Librarians in the Brock University Faculty Association

      Ribaric, Tim (Litwin Books, LLC, 2014)
      The ability to perform collegial governance is a cornerstone of modern universities in the United States and Canada. This idea of governance is well practiced among faculty members but is not often practiced to the same extent with librarians in those same institutions. In this chapter, I will look at a popular form of collegial governance called the Library Council. Further, I will examine how the Library Council at Brock University has enabled librarians there to perform meaningful collegial self-governance.
    • A Community Without a Space: Digital Scholarship at Brock University

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-08-01)
      The Digital Scholarship Lab at Brock University was originally set to open in the fall of 2018. However, the opening was delayed to the following summer. What that meant is that during the last academic year digital scholarship support has been provided by a nomadic team, relying on convincing ideas and compelling project work to increase the profile of the service. This session will look at the trajectory of that year and the many services that were piloted despite the lack of any physical footprint.
    • Copyright in the Stacks: The Chilling Effects of Unclear Copyright Interpretations in the Canadian Academic Library

      Ribaric, Tim (2015-01-21)
      The Canadian academic library is often seen as a vibrant place where the creation and sharing of knowledge plays a pivotal role in the intellectual life of the University. However this longstanding tradition is slowing being eroded by changes in copyright legislation and through infringement claims from content creators. Libraries are increasingly being placed in situations where they are expected to provide access to licensed material without clear ideas on what acceptable terms of use accompany those materials. Due to this lack of clarity Libraries are rescinding key services and being forced to spend ever increasing amounts to ensure proper licensing fees and usage rights are established. This paper will describe the current landscape surrounding this phenomenon and shed light on the chilling effects of these unclear interpretations. These results will be then be contrasted against the gains that Libraries have been making on behalf of their users in terms of advocacy and education in alternative forms of copyright.
    • DESIGN SPRINTS AND DIRECT EXPERIMENTATION: DIGITAL HUMANITIES MUSIC PEDAGOGY AT A SMALL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE

      Murgu, Cal (Music Library Association, 2021-06)
      In this essay, we detail the pedagogical collaboration between a digital humanities librarian, a professor of music and digital media, and a second-year music student that took the form of a design sprint. The product of the design sprint was the Mapping Sentiments through Music (MStM) application. Using this project as a case study, we argue that both digital humanities and music education share a commonality: both disciplines can incorporate elements of design thinking to be successful. As a result, our efforts center direct experimentation with a team, and foster design thinking by promoting descriptive exchange, creative problem solving, and the creation of emergent rather than explicitly delimited meanings. We conclude with several remarks on overlaps between music and design pedagogy, and on librarian-faculty collaborations. This article was published in the Music Library Association’s journal, Notes 77, 4, June 2021, and 561-585. The version of record is available at https://proxy.library.brocku.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=150204301&site=ehost-live&scope=site. This material may not be copied or reposted without written permission of MLA
    • Drop-In Clinics for Environmental Studies Students

      Jacklin, Marcie; Bordonaro, Karen (2008)
      The delivery of library instruction to students in those areas of the sciences and the social sciences dealing with biology and the environment has a long history (Bowden & Di Benedetto 2001; Kutner 2000; Kutner & Danks 2007; Sapp 2006; Sinn 1998). Often these instruction sessions take the form of a one hour lecture or workshop at the start of a semester before the students have begun their projects or papers. This "one-shot" approach, though popular, has its limitations. It may not be offered at a time when the students will actually start making use of library resources, it may not be tied very specifically to a particular assignment, or it may be too general in nature to be of much use to students later on when they need to look at particular topics in much more depth than can be addressed in one such session. The following article describes another approach: the strategic use of drop-in clinics as a method of instruction in which the students themselves determine how the instruction proceeds.
    • The End of Libraries and Librarianship - Part 34

      Gordon, Ian D. (The Informed Librarian Online, 2021-01-04)
      Librarians have bemoaned the constant clatter overheard from commentators that libraries are obsolete and no longer relevant. This observation is contrary to the lived experiences of those that serve in and depend upon public and academic libraries. A call to action challenges librarians everywhere to change this narrative by intentionally sharing stories of their essential work, service, community building… with anyone who will listen. An annotated list of readings and streaming videos is provided that builds on the inspirational work of David Lankes, Lisa Peet, Lance Werner, Mark Smith, Shamichael Hallman, Catherine Murray-Must, Michael Stephens and others. Libraries are observed to be places of transformative change. Librarians are found to be passionate, courageous and indispensable. Story telling is a powerful instrument for librarians and people that volunteer and serve in libraries to make the seemingly invisible work of libraries - more visible.
    • ESL Collections, University Libraries, and Internationalization

      Bordonaro, Karen (LEAA (Lenguas en Aprendizaje Autodirigido) Revista Electronica, 2015-03)
      This research study examines the content, types of materials, locations, and library collection development policies concerning ESL (English as a second language) materials collections on university campuses in the United States and Canada. ESL learning materials are defined in this study as those materials supporting adult learners who are non-native speakers of English in a higher education setting. The purpose of this study is to describe the content and types of materials in these collections, to learn where these collections are typically housed on university campuses, to discover what collection development policies may inform the building of these collections, and to explore the potential significance of these collections for university libraries. The overriding question that informs this study is the following: Can involvement with ESL collections serve as a way for university libraries to participate in internationalization by supporting the language needs of international students?
    • Evolution of Various Library Instruction Strategies: Using Student Feedback to Create and Enhance Online Active Learning Assignments

      Jacklin, Marcie; Robinson, Keely (2013)
      This case study traces the evolution of library assignments for biological science students from paper-based workbooks in a blended (hands-on) workshop to blended learning workshops using online assignments to online active learning modules which are stand-alone without any face-to-face instruction. As the assignments evolved to adapt to online learning supporting materials in the form of PDFs (portable document format), screen captures and screencasting were embedded into the questions as teaching moments to replace face-to-face instruction. Many aspects of the evolution of the assignment were based on student feedback from evaluations, input from senior lab demonstrators and teaching assistants, and statistical analysis of the students’ performance on the assignment. Advantages and disadvantages of paper-based and online assignments are discussed. An important factor for successful online learning may be the ability to get assistance.
    • The Experience of International Students at Cross-Border University Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (International Journal of Librarianship, 2017-12)
      This article describes the results of a small research study investigating international student library use and perceptions in a cross-border setting. The graduate degree program at the center of this study is a binational joint degree M.A. program in Canadian-American studies that takes place simultaneously at Brock University in Canada and at the State University of New York at Buffalo in the United States. The students’ library use was explored as were their perceptions of the two different university library systems. Results indicate that students in such joint degree programs do make use of cross-border university libraries and that they see benefits in doing so. This suggests that these library settings offer librarians a unique but viable way of working with international students, and that cross-border university libraries are worthy of both mention and further study in librarianship
    • An Exploration of Faculty Experiences With Open Access Journal Publishing at Two Canadian Comprehensive Universities

      Yates, Elizabeth (Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, 2016)
      Introduction: This exploratory study was intended to shed light on Canadian academics’ participation in, knowledge of and attitudes towards Open Access (OA) journal publishing. The primary aim of the study was to inform the authors’ schools’ educational and outreach efforts to faculty regarding OA publishing. The survey was conducted at two Canadian comprehensive universities: Brock University (St. Catharines, Ontario) and Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo, Ontario) in 2014. Methods: A web-based survey was distributed to faculty at each university. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Limitations: Despite the excellent response rates, the results are not generalizable beyond these two institutions. Results: The Brock response rate was 38%; the Laurier response rate was 23% from full-time faculty and five percent from part-time faculty. Brock and Laurier faculty members share common characteristics in both their publishing practices and attitudes towards OA. Science/health science researchers were the most positive about OA journal publishing; arts and humanities and social sciences respondents were more mixed in their Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, vol. 11, no. 2 (2016) 2 perceptions; business participants were the least positive. Their concerns focused on OA journal quality and associated costs. Conclusion: While most survey respondents agreed that publicly available research is generally a good thing, this study has clearly identified obstacles that prevent faculty’s positive attitudes towards OA from translating into open publishing practices.
    • Exploring the Connections between Information Literacy and Writing for International Students

      Bordonaro, Karen; Bordonaro, Karen (Journal of Information Literacy, 2008-12)
      a mixed-method investigation of undergraduate and graduate international students' proficiencies in both information literacy and academic writing to see if a relationship exists between them
    • Extraterrestrial Human Geographies

      Whipple, Heather (2013-06)
      In 2007, Fraser MacDonald put out a call for human geographers to get involved in space studies research, given the ways that geopolitical systems on Earth are likely to affect the future uses of outer space by those groups that can access it. Hoping to jumpstart a critical geography of outer space, MacDonald argues that human geography’s advances in analysing the concept of space as socially produced, as a system or network of interrelationships, and as an arena for social justice, make human geography particularly able to engage with concerns relating to current and future human activities beyond our home planet. By examining how human geographers have already engaged with outer space and then looking more closely at how geographical theories of place intersect with a selection of representations of human engagement with outer space, this project extends MacDonald’s foundation to be a launch pad for continued research into the cultural geographies of extraterrestrial spaces.