• Adult education and academic libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (EmeraldInsight, 2018)
      Abstract Purpose – The purpose of this review is to offer practicing academic librarians an overview of adult education theories as a way to more deeply understand and further foster adult learning in academic libraries. Design/methodology approach – This article is a literature review. Findings – This review introduces academic librarians to a range of specific adult education learning theories, it offers examples of academic library users engaging in these types of adult learning, it considers how academic libraries can further foster adult learning, and it identifies major characteristics of adult learners. Originality/value – This literature review offers a summative overview of adult education in a way that has not appeared in the library literature to date, along with explicit connections between adult education theories and academic library practices.
    • Adult learning theories and autoethnography: Informing the practice of information literacy

      Bordonaro, Karen (Sage, 2020-03)
      The learning theories of self-directed learning and lifelong learning can inform the practice of information literacy in higher education for adult learners. These theories lend themselves to the use of autoethnography, a research methodology that relies on the exploration of lived experiences through reflexivity informed by theory. In conducting an autoethnography on information literacy, its practice appears as both a singular and a collective activity. Multiple ramifications for practice come from this exploration. These ramifications include considerations of choices, barriers, conducive learning environments, informal learning opportunities, and the need for reflection for adult learners. Applying the learning theories of self-directed learning and lifelong learning to the practice of information literacy offers librarians new and useful perspectives on its practice with adult learners.
    • Drop-In Clinics for Environmental Studies Students

      Jacklin, Marcie; Bordonaro, Karen (2008)
      The delivery of library instruction to students in those areas of the sciences and the social sciences dealing with biology and the environment has a long history (Bowden & Di Benedetto 2001; Kutner 2000; Kutner & Danks 2007; Sapp 2006; Sinn 1998). Often these instruction sessions take the form of a one hour lecture or workshop at the start of a semester before the students have begun their projects or papers. This "one-shot" approach, though popular, has its limitations. It may not be offered at a time when the students will actually start making use of library resources, it may not be tied very specifically to a particular assignment, or it may be too general in nature to be of much use to students later on when they need to look at particular topics in much more depth than can be addressed in one such session. The following article describes another approach: the strategic use of drop-in clinics as a method of instruction in which the students themselves determine how the instruction proceeds.
    • ESL Collections, University Libraries, and Internationalization

      Bordonaro, Karen (LEAA (Lenguas en Aprendizaje Autodirigido) Revista Electronica, 2015-03)
      This research study examines the content, types of materials, locations, and library collection development policies concerning ESL (English as a second language) materials collections on university campuses in the United States and Canada. ESL learning materials are defined in this study as those materials supporting adult learners who are non-native speakers of English in a higher education setting. The purpose of this study is to describe the content and types of materials in these collections, to learn where these collections are typically housed on university campuses, to discover what collection development policies may inform the building of these collections, and to explore the potential significance of these collections for university libraries. The overriding question that informs this study is the following: Can involvement with ESL collections serve as a way for university libraries to participate in internationalization by supporting the language needs of international students?
    • The Experience of International Students at Cross-Border University Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (International Journal of Librarianship, 2017-12)
      This article describes the results of a small research study investigating international student library use and perceptions in a cross-border setting. The graduate degree program at the center of this study is a binational joint degree M.A. program in Canadian-American studies that takes place simultaneously at Brock University in Canada and at the State University of New York at Buffalo in the United States. The students’ library use was explored as were their perceptions of the two different university library systems. Results indicate that students in such joint degree programs do make use of cross-border university libraries and that they see benefits in doing so. This suggests that these library settings offer librarians a unique but viable way of working with international students, and that cross-border university libraries are worthy of both mention and further study in librarianship
    • Forging Multiple Pathways: Integrating International Students into a Canadian University Library

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2019-01)
      This chapter describes five different projects undertaken at the Brock University Library in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, which represent different pathways toward integrating international students into academic libraries. These projects were designed to welcome and introduce international students to the library as well as to support their extended learning by the library. Each of them represents a different type of pathway toward that goal of integration.
    • Internationalization in German Academic Libraries: Moving beyond North American Perspectives

      Bordonaro, Karen; Rauchmann, Sabine (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015-10)
      This paper explores how internationalization is understood and experienced in German academic libraries. Its main purpose is to move the discussion of internationalization in academic libraries beyond the boundaries of English-speaking North America by investigating a European perspective. Its secondary purpose is to investigate the role of English in German academic libraries. An online survey and a series of in-person interviews conducted in Germany in April 2015 provided the data for this study. What emerged are a series of stated differences and similarities between North America and Germany informed by the two overarching themes of implicit internationalization and plurilingualism, the ability to switch from one language to another as required.
    • Librarians and ESL Instructors as Campus Partners in Collaboration and Alliance Building

      Bordonaro, Karen (Collaborative Librarianship, 2018-06)
      Librarians and English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors can be campus partners to improve student learning. This article describes one way for librarians to begin working collaboratively with their ESL instructor counterparts on a university campus. It offers the creation and use of an assessment tool designed to capture ESL students’ library learning as an initial point of collaboration. Following the discussion of the creation and use of this tool, this article then advocates for librarians and ESL instructors to build mutually beneficial alliances between them. These alliances can be based on commonalities and can offer benefits for professionals working in both roles on campus.
    • Libraries and the Arctic: Language Education Support

      Bordonaro, Karen; Angalik, Shelby (LIBREAS: Library Ideas, 2018-05)
      The Arctic inspires awe. This unique region of the world has been studied in many ways by many different disciplines. The discipline of librarianship can also add to its study. In this article, the authors, a practicing Canadian librarian at Brock University in Ontario and an Inuktitut student enrolled at the same university, offer a suggested role for libraries to play in the ongoing study of the Arctic. They explore and describe the role of libraries in supporting native Arctic language education. Support for learning and preserving native Arctic languages can be found in library collections, spaces and services. This article looks at support of native speakers and other interested language learners, support of language research, support of language preservation, and support of new publishing opportunities that can be provided by or through libraries. These language support examples come from a document analysis that perused web sites, conference proceedings, published scholarship in the form of books and articles, newspaper sources, and personal background knowledge of the authors. Documents were collected, categorized, and described. The language support categories that emerged illustrate the many different ways that libraries can engage in native Arctic language education support. In offering this role, the authors hope to provide a means for librarians to learn more about the Arctic as well as a way for libraries to contribute to knowledge of the Arctic.
    • Overcoming Language Barriers for Non-Native Speakers of English: Learner Autonomy in Academic Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2019)
      The purpose of this chapter is to give librarians a brief overview of the theory of learner autonomy and to explain how fostering its presence in libraries can help overcome language barriers for non-native speakers of English.
    • Scholarship as a Conversation: A Metaphor for Librarian-ESL Instructor Collaboration

      Bordonaro, Karen (2015)
      Invoking the metaphor of scholarship as a conversation offers academic librarians an excellent way to connect information literacy to university ESL (English as a second language) classes. This article describes how this particular metaphor has appeared in the literature of librarianship, and it suggests that this metaphor offers a deeper way to understand and promote information literacy to ESL students. It connects this deeper understanding of information literacy to ESL writing and speaking instructional approaches. These approaches include understanding scholarship as both a formal written end product and as a writing process in the creation, production and dissemination of knowledge. In addition, understanding scholarship as a conversation is described as including recognition of both formal and informal means of communication. Practical examples of classroom activities are also offered that librarians can use to support these different ways of illustrating scholarship as a conversation. Collaboration between librarians and instructors is advocated in order to fully invoke this metaphor as a way to connect information literacy to ESL classrooms.
    • Self-Directed Second Language Learning in Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (International Society for Self-Directed Learning, 2018-11)
      This content analysis research study investigated self-directed language learning of adult English as a second language (ESL) learners in libraries. ESL learners are a growing population in libraries, and understanding how they can use or are using libraries helps libraries better serve them. The purpose of this study was to determine if they can or are engaging in self-directed learning in libraries. The documents analyzed comprised library journal articles and library websites. The first finding suggests that self-directed second language learning is taking place in libraries but mainly through online instruction. The second finding is that many types of second language learning material are available for use in and through libraries. The third finding is that physical spaces dedicated to second language learning do exist in libraries. Together, these findings show that library services, resources, and spaces can support self-directed second language learners in their learning.