• A Basis for Understanding Volunteer Coach Retention in Youth Sports

      Broer, Richard; Applied Health Sciences Program (Brock University, 2012-07-23)
      Youth sport organizations depend on volunteers to coach the teams in the organization. The purpose of this quantitative study was to develop a further understanding of volunteer coach retention in youth sport. The data was collected through a quantitative questionnaire which used close-ended and Likert-scale questions. The questionnaire collected data on the modified Model of Volunteer Retention in Youth Sports, reasons to withdraw from coaching and human resource management. There were 126 surveys collected from members of the three largest youth sport associations in the town of Aylmer, Ontario. The study found that Person-Task fit was the best predictor of volunteer coach retention as it significantly correlated to one’s intention to continue coaching (p< 0.01). Furthermore, additional reasons were found to explain withdrawal from coaching - if one’s child stops playing the sport or if coaching is too time consuming. The retention of volunteer coaches in youth sport organizations requires a multi-dimensional approach in understanding how to best retain volunteer coaches.
    • Exploring Parental Experiences and Meaning of Involvement within Youth Sport: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

      Maxwell, Keetyn; Applied Health Sciences Program
      By applying an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, the purpose of the study was to explore the lived experience of parental involvement in youth sport and the meaning the involvement holds. Specifically, I wanted to examine how role identity theory can provide deeper understanding to how parents experience and provide meaning to their involvement in their children’s sport. A key aspect to the study is that as the researcher, I was attempting to understand the experiences of the participant’s meaning-making. Master themes that capture the overall phenomenon were constructed that were present across the majority of participants while still allowing for each participant’s unique experience to be understood. The overarching themes interpreted from the data include: Desiring Involvement, Onus on Parental Roles within Involvement, Commitment, and Constructing Meaning-making of the Experience. These findings highlight the ways in which role identity salience defines the experience and the meaning involvement holds to a parent. This study provided deeper theoretical understanding of the experience of being a parent involved in youth sport, as well as highlighted the usefulness of conducting research in this field with an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach to explore a complex and diverse topic.
    • The Influence of Motivational Behaviours and Goal Profiles on Positive Youth Development

      Marini, Matthew; Applied Health Sciences Program
      Positive Youth Development (PYD) research has started to shift focus onto how different internal factors such as temperament, dispositions, and/or personality characteristics could influence levels of PYD for youth participating is organized sport. The purpose of this study is to examine how different goal profiles, specifically categorized by diverse levels of task and ego orientation, can influence levels of PYD in an organized youth sport setting. One hundred youth sport participants (mean age = 16.8) completed the short form Youth Experiences Survey for Sport (short form YES-S; Sullivan et al., 2013) to measure PYD, as well as the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ; Duba 1989) to assess each athlete’s goal profile. A TwoStep Cluster Analysis was used to classify each individual’s personal goal profile into 3 statistically different cluster groupings. Results indicated significant interaction between the PYD outcome factor of Initiative vs. Clusters [F(2,95)= 10.86, p < 0.001, p2= 0.19] as well as Goal Setting vs. Clusters [F(2,95)= 3.95, p < 0.05, p2= 0.08]. Post-hoc analyses provided results that suggest that those athletes who are more task oriented have fostered more positive outcomes from sport, therefore having more goal setting skills and initiative.