• Accounting students and information competence: evidence from course syllabi and professional accounting association competency maps.

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (Special Libraries Association, 2009-06-15)
      As Brock University’s business liaison librarian, I have had some success integrating information literacy in the business administration curriculum. However, there have been very few requests for instruction in undergraduate accounting courses. Therefore, in the spirit of evidence-based librarianship, I conducted a syllabus study in order to gain insight into the library use and research expectations of accounting faculty for their undergraduate accounting students. Syllabi from 65 sections of 23 accounting courses were examined from the 2008/09 academic year. Each course section was assigned a level of library use based on a scale of 0 (no research required) to 4 (significant research required). Over 58% of all course sections required no research or library use and only 13% of course sections, mostly at the 400 level, actually required some amount of library use or research. These findings were compared to the expected professional competencies and proficiency levels as articulated by professional accounting association competency maps and an expectations gap was identified. As Brock University Library’s goal is to integrate information literacy into the curriculum, this evidence-based study will serve to open a dialogue with accounting faculty regarding information competence so that a course-integrated information literacy program may be planned and delivered in alignment with curricular and professional expectations.
    • Are we walking the talk? Tensions between librarians' values, academic freedom and open scholarship

      Yates, Elizabeth (2019-06)
      Open access - the practice of freely sharing scholarly outputs online -- is steadily garnering support across the research community. At academic institutions, libraries are usually the standard-bearers for this trend, advancing open scholarship by providing services, infrastructure and funding - for example, employing scholarly communication experts, operating institutional repositories, and funding open access publication costs. This investment in personnel and resources reflects a shared priority of advancing more equitable systems for creating and sharing knowledge. Our professional organizations publicly espouse these values and engage in advocacy to advance open access projects and uptake. At an institutional level, library workers often lead the development of campus open access policies which encourage or commit researchers to publicly share their work. In Canada, nine academic institutions and ten libraries/librarian councils have adopted open access policies. Despite this wealth of activity and public professions of support for open scholarship, it is unclear whether academic librarians in Canada actually practice what we preach. Most of the open access statements/policies adopted by libraries merely encourage workers to make their scholarship freely available. Anecdotal evidence indicates a minority of us are actually archiving our work in institutional repositories or publishing in open access journals. This paper will provide preliminary results from a survey exploring how Canadian academic librarians’ professional, personal and collective values impact our publishing practices. In particular, results from this study will indicate how academic freedom provisions -- articulated in collective agreements, institutional policies and by professional organizations including CAPAL and CAUT -- may affect whether we choose to support open access with our words and actions. Academic freedom is usually appreciated as a protective measure, guarding librarians and faculty against repercussions for work or speech which may be viewed as controversial. Independently choosing how to disseminate research is often a key tenet of academic freedom policies. Accordingly, librarians may experience tension between our personal/professional support for the principle of open access and our will to exert academic freedom and publish where we please – including closed-access venues. This discordance not only affects our own scholarly practices but should also be acknowledged within librarians’ continuing efforts to encourage faculty to embrace open access.
    • Benchmarking business database holdings in Canada: Results of a gap analysis

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (2015-04-14)
      This lightning talk presents the results of an exploratory study of the database holdings of an aspirant group of ten AACSB/Equis accredited Canadian business schools with doctoral programs. Who had the most databases? What were the most widely held titles? What does a gap analysis reveal about how Brock University fares against this aspirant group?
    • Beyond CRAAP: Critical Thinking in the Age of Fake News

      Thiessen, Jennifer; MacKinnon, Colleen; Pemberton, Amanda (2019-01-30)
      In this age of fake news, clickbait, and alternative facts, how can we equip students to find the truth? While fake news is not a new concept, its ubiquity has made it increasingly difficult to distinguish between what is real and what is fabricated. Library professionals have long been in the business of teaching critical thinking and source evaluation. How can we leverage this knowledge to teach students to be confident information consumers and creators? This session will review online learning content created by librarians at Brock University, including a media literacy tutorial for students in the Teacher Education program, and an online workshop on identifying fake news and critically evaluating news information. We will explore the importance of teaching media literacy and critical thinking skills, outline strategies for moving beyond the checklist approach to evaluating information, and share successes, challenges and next steps.
    • Brock’s New Digital Scholarship Lab: Partnering and Collaborating for Success

      Nolan, Nicole; Robertson, Mark; Ribaric, Tim (2019-02-01)
      Brock University will open a new SIF-funded facility in the spring of 2019 dedicated to transdisciplinary research, commercialization and entrepreneurship. The new Rankin Family Pavilion at the front door of the campus is home to Brock LINC, a collaborative approach to innovation. Brock Library's Digital Scholarship Lab and Makerspace will join other units in the facility, such as BioLINC (incubator), the Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute’s Virtual Reality Consumer Lab, the Goodman School of Business Consulting Group, and the Centre for Innovation, Management and Enterprise Education (CIMEE). This session will focus on the role of the Digital Scholarship Lab (DSL) within the context of this new innovation ecosystem. Digital scholarship is by its nature collaborative, multi-disciplinary and draws upon a broad range of expertise in areas such as data science, research data management, high performance computing (HPC), data visualization, virtual objects and simulations, geospatial technologies, and computational textual analysis. The Digital Scholarship Lab in the new facility will be a hub to explore, discover, create, and play with data and visual tools, methods, and objects. Programming, is offered by the Library in partnership with central IT, Brock's Compute Canada/SharcNet representative, and the Centre for Digital Humanities. We also collaborate with the other Brock LINC units. Drawing on technical expertise from both inside and outside of our own domain enables us to offer a more robust suite of services for our users. Attendees of this session will: 1) learn about models of digital scholarship, 2) learn about the role of collaboration and partnering in an innovation ecosystem, and 3) learn about some of the challenges of developing a digital program in a collaborative context. Presentation Material from Ontario Library Association (OLA) Superconference 2019.
    • Canada's new Open Access policy: Integrating libraries into open scholarship

      Burpee, Jane; Coughlan, Rosarie; Johnston, Dave; Moore, Patricia; Yates, Elizabeth (2016-01)
    • Cluster Computing for Humans -OR- Have you heard of this HPCPack?

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-05-30)
      Presentation material from code4Lib North 2019, held at McMaster.
    • Codifying Academic Freedom: An Examination of Collective Agreements for Librarian Specific Language

      Ribaric, Tim (2018-05-30)
      Academic Freedom is a foundational component of the modern University. The notion is brought to life and exercised through a very particular article of the collective agreement. This article almost always provides a well honed, lofty, and almost self-evident description of the protections to teaching, and research that need to be maintained. Challenging ideas in the classroom are shielded from the reluctant hang wringing of administrators. Research that pushes boundaries and challenges norms proceeds with a slow march for the betterment of all. Our traditional Faculty colleagues conduct their business with full confidence that their activities are well protected, yet what about us as Professional Librarians? In most cases we can rely on this same exact article to afford protections. This is of course due to the fact that we are in the same bargaining units as those traditional Faculty members and are bound to the language as well. Yet, when pressed, does this language really offer protections to Professional Librarians that are specific to the work they conduct? A judicious application of teaching and research for the traditional Faculty member is hard to parallel with certain core Librarian duties. Where does collection development fit? Collaborating on an in-depth research consultation that might unearth ideas contrary to what the institution holds as fundamental? In some cases the collective agreement is silent on these activities. While most would view these types of conduct allowable under the spirit of academic freedom it is possible that a strict interpretation would exclude these endeavours from established protections. Fortunately this is not always the case, and as time progresses breaks to this trend develop. A selection of collective agreements of Canadian universities now have specific provisions for the conduct of Professional Librarians under the overarching concept of Academic Freedom. This paper will attempt to present this landscape by examining text from collective agreements of Canadian institutions to see how (if at all) protections for Librarians are constructed.
    • Diving into the ACRL Framework: Engaging Graduate Students with Threshold Concepts

      2015-06-16
      Librarians face many challenges when planning instruction for graduate students. Masters and PhD students typically arrive in their programs with wide ranging research skills and backgrounds. They may have assumptions about how research should be conducted or, conversely, they may feel out of their depth in the research of their discipline. The nature of threshold concepts—that they are transformative, integrative, irreversible, bounded, and troublesome—make them an ideal way to connect with students at the graduate level. Not only can librarians use these concepts to inform their teaching, but they can use threshold concepts to challenge and engage students in their thinking about how research is created, produced, and disseminated in their field(s). Join Brock University liaison librarians Jennifer Thiessen and Justine Cotton as they share how they have integrated concepts from the Framework into library workshops for graduate students. Jennifer has successfully used several of the threshold concepts to rework thinking among educators about critical thinking and credibility assessment. As co-instructor for a second-year PhD Humanities course, Justine has incorporated the threshold concepts into the design of three library workshops on the topics of resource discovery, information management, and publishing. While the instructional content does not change significantly, incorporating threshold concepts paves the way for deeper understanding, provocative discussions, and a more collegial atmosphere.
    • Engaging Faculty to Advance Campus Open Access Policies: Strategies and Lessons Learned

      Yates, Elizabeth; Kirchner, Joy; Robertson, Mark (2019-01-30)
      As champions of creating more equitable systems for sharing scholarly research, libraries are typically the leaders in developing open access policies at their institutions. This work aligns with evidence that effective policies can accelerate researchers’ adoption of open access and increase their rates of open access publishing/archiving. The benefits of Institutional open access policies include increasing public access to taxpayer-funded research, enhancing the visibility and impact of an institution’s research output and supporting author rights. While increasing numbers of institutions are adopting these policies, they are often a tough sell due to misconceptions about open access and concerns about infringing on faculty's academic freedom to publish where they please. Presenters and participants will discuss strategies for working with stakeholders to overcome barriers and create buy-in for openly sharing research. Participants will learn of models and tools for open access policy development and presenters will share insights and campus engagement strategies from their development of institutional open access policies at York University and Brock University.
    • Gathering Library data and creating visualizations the easy way!

      Ribaric, Tim (2018-02-02)
      Statistics and visualizations are important tools Libraries use to tell their stories. This poster will present a statistics capturing and display package that runs on the bare minimum: Google Forms, D3, and HTML. The features of the platform will be showcased with data collected from the Brock University Library.
    • Git It Done with GitHub: Digital Scholarship with Open Tools

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-06-03)
      Presentation material from Lightning Talk done at Digital Odyssey, 2019. Held in North York Central Library. Event sponsored and organized by Ontario Library and Information Technology (OLITA), a division of Ontario Library Association (OLA)
    • How To Fulfil All Our Lending and (Our Patrons’) Borrowing Dreams

      Taves, Adam; Whidden, Linda; Gibson, Ian (Ontario Library Association Super Conference 2020, 2020-01-29)
      Collaborative Futures (CF), a project to implement a shared library system for 14 Ontario universities, is about radical collaboration. The CF Shared Resources Working Group will discuss dreaming big to create, sell, and implement a vision of long and liberal loan policies, minimal fines, and easy cross-consortium borrowing.
    • I didn't become a worse Librarian when I became a Grad Student

      Ribaric, Tim (2017-05-11)
      Presentation made at code4Lib North 2017 at University of Ottawa. Looks at the process and reflections of continuing education and graduate studies for mature students.
    • I still haven't found what I'm looking for: Reflections on 10+ years of providing library orientation and instruction to a Business English bridging program

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (2017-05-11)
      A librarian's personal reflection on 10 plus years of providing orientation and information literacy instruction to graduate students in a Business English bridging program at Brock University.
    • InfoSkills PLUS: Your Key to Research Success

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (Association of College and Research Libraries, 2005-04-07)
      Discover the advantages of collaborating with other campus partners to develop, promote, and deliver a unique non-credit interactive information skills workshop series. Learn the importance of flexibility interactivity and modularity to the success of a non-credit information skills program. Learn how to incorporate the knowledge management practices of Learning Before, Learning During, and Learning After into team project activities.
    • Library Open Access publishing funds

      Yates, Elizabeth (SlideShare, 2014-05)
      Presentation on scope, successes and challenges facing library Open Access publishing funds delivered at the Canadian Association of Learned Journals meeting at Congress 2014, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada. Focus on Canada but also some info on the U.S.
    • Licensing, Demystified

      Gibson, Ian (2019-02)
      Slides from 2019 OLA Conference presentation