• Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (The Reading Matrix, 2011-09)
      survey of international students in a university library as to whether or not they engage in recreational reading and if they think it helps their language learning
    • Redux: Tabulating Transactions with Raspberry Pi and Visualizing Results

      Ribaric, Tim (code4Lib, 2018-05-07)
      Often in the library tech world we are not given the opportunity to attempt a project again. Effort spent re-doing a previous project in a different way, in some sense, means wasting time that could be used to work on new initiatives. This article describes a redux of a project, a revenge story so to speak. In 2013 the Arduino based Tabulatron first entered production at Brock University Library. The device had its flaws, an attempt to rectify those flaws was manifested in the creation of the PiTab, the story of which is presented here.
    • Revolution or evolution? Lessons learned from a business syllabus study.

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (Special Libraries Association, Business & Finance Division, 2015-06-16)
      Although the business school student population at Brock University was growing, requests for traditional in-class information literacy instruction (ILI) sessions were declining as faculty made room in the curriculum for ‘service learning’. I conducted a comprehensive syllabus study of the undergraduate business curriculum in order to better understand this evolving instructional environment. My primary objective was to investigate the research, data, and library use expectations of business school faculty for their undergraduate students, to gain deeper insight into the extent and nature of research-intensive assignments, including those with a service learning component. My secondary objective was to identify new instructional opportunities in order to be strategic in my outreach efforts. A total of 257 syllabi from 86 courses (representing 91% of all course offerings) were rated according to a 5-point scale of prescribed research, data, or library use. Initial analysis identified 38 different courses with significant research expectations, including 13 courses with a service learning component. A comparison of the 38 research-intensive courses against my own ILI statistics identified 26 courses (including 10 service learning courses) for follow up contact. I hope to devise a plan to provide more relevant and responsive ILI support for these research-intensive courses. As a result of this syllabus study, I now have a much better understanding of the undergraduate business curriculum, and where I might add value, in order to revolutionize my ILI practice.
    • Scaling up research data services: a saga of organizational redesign gone awry

      Lowry, Linda (IASSIST, 2021-05-17)
      An academic library may initiate organizational renewal and redesign in order to better pursue new strategic priorities. In the case of the Brock University Library, one of these priorities was active engagement throughout the research life cycle. The draft organizational design framework proposed the creation of a new unit that takes a holistic life cycle approach to research, including data literacy, research data management and other services. Unfortunately, it also called for the elimination of the role of subject liaison librarians, who would be redeployed in other ways. No one was more shocked at this turn of events than me, because as the Business and Economics Librarian, I know how crucial it is to understand the disciplinary landscape with respect to research practices in order to develop research data services that align with researcher needs. This study provides evidence for the discipline-specific needs of business and economics researchers for data reference, data literacy, and data retrieval assistance, derived from a content analysis of graduate student theses and a review of consultation statistics. Will this evidence be sufficient to preserve this role, or will this become a saga of organizational redesign gone awry?
    • Scholarship as a Conversation: A Metaphor for Librarian-ESL Instructor Collaboration

      Bordonaro, Karen (2015)
      Invoking the metaphor of scholarship as a conversation offers academic librarians an excellent way to connect information literacy to university ESL (English as a second language) classes. This article describes how this particular metaphor has appeared in the literature of librarianship, and it suggests that this metaphor offers a deeper way to understand and promote information literacy to ESL students. It connects this deeper understanding of information literacy to ESL writing and speaking instructional approaches. These approaches include understanding scholarship as both a formal written end product and as a writing process in the creation, production and dissemination of knowledge. In addition, understanding scholarship as a conversation is described as including recognition of both formal and informal means of communication. Practical examples of classroom activities are also offered that librarians can use to support these different ways of illustrating scholarship as a conversation. Collaboration between librarians and instructors is advocated in order to fully invoke this metaphor as a way to connect information literacy to ESL classrooms.
    • Self-Directed Second Language Learning in Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (International Society for Self-Directed Learning, 2018-11)
      This content analysis research study investigated self-directed language learning of adult English as a second language (ESL) learners in libraries. ESL learners are a growing population in libraries, and understanding how they can use or are using libraries helps libraries better serve them. The purpose of this study was to determine if they can or are engaging in self-directed learning in libraries. The documents analyzed comprised library journal articles and library websites. The first finding suggests that self-directed second language learning is taking place in libraries but mainly through online instruction. The second finding is that many types of second language learning material are available for use in and through libraries. The third finding is that physical spaces dedicated to second language learning do exist in libraries. Together, these findings show that library services, resources, and spaces can support self-directed second language learners in their learning.
    • Selling Infrastructure as a Service to faculty

      Ribaric, Tim (2020-10-23)
      Presentation material for session presented at 2020 Access Conference for session entitled Selling Infrastructure as a Service to faculty. Abstract: Libraries aim to provide tools and platforms to support the research enterprise of the institution. This session will look at how a Docker based IAAS service was branded and marketed to researchers. The real challenge was communicating what could be done with the service in a way that avoided jargon and was accessible to introductory users.
    • Stories of Informal Mentorship: Recognizing the Voices of Mentees in Academic Libraries

      MacKinnon, Colleen; Shepley, Susan (Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, 2014-04-28)
      Based on the 2014 OLA Super Conference session “Mentorship in Academic Libraries: A Universe of Possibilities,” this article explores the benefits of informal mentorship in its various forms and how librarians are embracing a new way of thinking about mentorship both individually and organizationally. The lived experiences of two professional academic librarians are shared as they argue that informal mentorship offers the opportunity to co-create a meaningful mentorship experience by recognizing the importance of the mentee’s voice. This paper will discuss the value of informal mentorship and how, when certain elements are present within it, this model can allow us to reimagine mentorship in academic libraries. Concepts such as “accidental” mentorship, “purposeful” mentorship, mentorship “network,” and “peer” mentorship are discussed.
    • To Jupyter and Beyond: Computational Notebooks in the Library

      Ribaric, Tim; Brett, Daniel (2020-01-29)
      Have you heard of Jupyter? Better yet, have you heard about how computational notebooks can be used to teach technologies and are part of the reproducible science movement? This session will show you the Juptyer platform and explain why you should know about it.
    • Visualize your doppelgänger: using information graphics to benchmark AACSB-accredited business schools.

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (Special Libraries Association, 2013-06-10)
      A poster presented at the 2013 SLA Annual Conference, Business & Finance Division poster session, June 10, 2013 in San Diego, CA.
    • Walking the plank: how scholarly piracy affects publishers, libraries and their users

      Yates, Elizabeth (Association of College and Research Libraries, 2017-03)
      The arrival of technology supporting peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing in scholarly communication has, until recently, had minimal impact on libraries. However, threats posed by pirate sites including Library Genesis Project (LibGen) and Sci-Hub are now impacting both library users and library licensing agreements with publishers. Publishers are nervous as they witness their proprietary content leaking out of paywalled systems—not just hundreds of thousands of articles, but millions. Accordingly, publishers are monitoring activities in licensed products very closely for any behavior that they deem suspicious. When a user’s activities cause a publisher to question whether materials are being pirated, the outcomes can vary. Consequences can range from relatively minor inconvenience for blocked users, who must find workarounds to access scholarly content—to the potential for major disruption of a centuries-old proprietary publishing system. This article uses a case study involving a student at Brock University to highlight significant challenges facing libraries and the rights of their users in the current environment of piracy-wary academic publishers.
    • We All Have an Accent: Welcoming International Students to the Library

      Bordonaro, Karen (Canadian Library Association, 2007)
      an overview of ways to make international students feel welcome in the library
    • We need to have a conversation about OpenURL, a close look at a corpus of error reports from the 2013 academic year. Or, How I learned to stop worrying and give up on clean metadata.

      Ribaric, Tim (2014-10-06)
      OpenURL has been a stalwart in the arsenal of Librarianship for many years now, but it is getting a bit long in the tooth, and cracks in the façade are showing. How well does it still stack up? In the fall of 2013 Brock University Library started looking at the reported errors generated through our OpenURL system to answer this question. By making a clever hack [1] to the error report mechanism it was possible to log all the malevolent OpenURLs in a database to see what the problem was. The end result is a corpus of around 1000 reported URLs [2] that were meticulously examined [3] to find the problem. In the end numerous things were discovered: - Some of the OpenURLs worked just as they were supposed to - Some databases provide really bad OpenURL requests - Some databases don't know how to resolve OpenURL requests properly - Punctuation in metadata often breaks OpenURL - Forget citations to supplementary material - DOI's can't save the day This poster will outline the details of the process and present visualizations of the results of the analysis. OpenURL looks great on paper but there ends up being many obstacles in the actual implementation that both frustrate users and leave Libraries feeling helpless as many of the fixes are out of their hands. [1] http://elibtronic.ca/content/20130823/tracking-sfx-error-reports-sans-effort [2] http://hdl.handle.net/10864/10653 [3] https://github.com/elibtronic/metadata-cruncher/tree/master/open_url_breaker
    • Working Together: Librarian and Student Collaboration Through Active Learning in a Library Eclassroom

      Jacklin, Marcie; Pfaff, Heather (2010)
      Active learning strategies based on several learning theories were incorporated during instruction sessions for second year Biological Sciences students. The instructional strategies described in this paper are based primarily on sociocultural and collaborative learning theory, with the goal being to expand the relatively small body of literature currently available that discusses the application of these learning theories to library instruction. The learning strategies employed successfully involved students in the learning process ensuring that the experiences were appropriate and effective. The researchers found that, as a result of these strategies (e.g. teaching moments based on the emerging needs of students) students’ interest in learning information literacy was increased and students interacted with information given to them as well as with their peers. Collaboration between the Librarians, Co-op Student and Senior Lab Instructor helped to enhance the learning experience for students and also revealed new aspects of the active learning experiences. The primary learning objective, which was to increase the students’ information skills in the Biological Sciences, was realized. The advantages of active learning were realized by both instructors and students. Advantages for students attained during these sessions include having their diverse learning styles addressed; increased interaction with and retention of information; increased responsibility for their own learning; the opportunity to value not only the instructors, but also themselves and their peers as sources of authority and knowledge; improved problem solving abilities; increased interest and opportunities for critical thinking, as a result of the actively exchanging information in a group. The primary advantage enjoyed by the instructors was the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to reduce the preparation required to create effective library instruction sessions. Opportunities for further research were also discovered, including the degree to which “social loafing” plays a role in collaborative, active learning.