• Perceptions of Technology and Manifestations of Language Learner Autonomy

      Bordonaro, Karen (Computer-Assisted Language Learning Electronic Journal, 2003-06)
      a grounded theory study investigating perceptions of technology by learners of English as a second language
    • Multiple Roles of Librarians

      Alsop, Justine; Bordonaro, Karen (Electronic Journal of Academic and Special Librarianship, 2007)
      a survey of academic librarians investigating other roles on campus they may work in besides that of librarian (ex. ESL teacher, aerobics instructor)
    • We All Have an Accent: Welcoming International Students to the Library

      Bordonaro, Karen (Canadian Library Association, 2007)
      an overview of ways to make international students feel welcome in the library
    • Drop-In Clinics for Environmental Studies Students

      Jacklin, Marcie; Bordonaro, Karen (2008)
      The delivery of library instruction to students in those areas of the sciences and the social sciences dealing with biology and the environment has a long history (Bowden & Di Benedetto 2001; Kutner 2000; Kutner & Danks 2007; Sapp 2006; Sinn 1998). Often these instruction sessions take the form of a one hour lecture or workshop at the start of a semester before the students have begun their projects or papers. This "one-shot" approach, though popular, has its limitations. It may not be offered at a time when the students will actually start making use of library resources, it may not be tied very specifically to a particular assignment, or it may be too general in nature to be of much use to students later on when they need to look at particular topics in much more depth than can be addressed in one such session. The following article describes another approach: the strategic use of drop-in clinics as a method of instruction in which the students themselves determine how the instruction proceeds.
    • Business data: issues and challenges from the Canadian perspective

      Lowry, Linda; Hong, Eun-ha (IASSIST, 2008-08-15)
      This paper explores the issues and challenges that we have faced as Canadian academic business librarians when working with business data. As this is an exploratory study, we hope only to start a discussion among data librarians about some key challenges facing the academic community related to supporting the teaching and research use of business data. Our paper begins with a brief discussion of general data trends, followed by a detailed exploration of business data trends and trends in Canadian business education. We discuss challenges and issues related to working with business data from both the collections and reference service perspectives, including the pros and cons of providing business data services and support within the library environment. We conclude by suggesting some measures that both academic business librarians and data librarians can take to address some of these challenges.
    • Exploring the Connections between Information Literacy and Writing for International Students

      Bordonaro, Karen; Bordonaro, Karen (Journal of Information Literacy, 2008-12)
      a mixed-method investigation of undergraduate and graduate international students' proficiencies in both information literacy and academic writing to see if a relationship exists between them
    • Accounting students and information competence: evidence from course syllabi and professional accounting association competency maps.

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (Special Libraries Association, 2009-06-15)
      As Brock University’s business liaison librarian, I have had some success integrating information literacy in the business administration curriculum. However, there have been very few requests for instruction in undergraduate accounting courses. Therefore, in the spirit of evidence-based librarianship, I conducted a syllabus study in order to gain insight into the library use and research expectations of accounting faculty for their undergraduate accounting students. Syllabi from 65 sections of 23 accounting courses were examined from the 2008/09 academic year. Each course section was assigned a level of library use based on a scale of 0 (no research required) to 4 (significant research required). Over 58% of all course sections required no research or library use and only 13% of course sections, mostly at the 400 level, actually required some amount of library use or research. These findings were compared to the expected professional competencies and proficiency levels as articulated by professional accounting association competency maps and an expectations gap was identified. As Brock University Library’s goal is to integrate information literacy into the curriculum, this evidence-based study will serve to open a dialogue with accounting faculty regarding information competence so that a course-integrated information literacy program may be planned and delivered in alignment with curricular and professional expectations.
    • Automatic Preparation of ETD Material from the Internet Archive for the DSpace Repository Platform

      Ribaric, Tim (2009-11-23)
      A big challenge associated with getting an institutional repository off the ground is getting content into it. This article will look at how to use digitization services at the Internet Archive alongside software utilities that the author developed to automate the harvesting of scanned dissertations and associated Dublin Core XML files to create an ETD Portal using the DSpace platform. The end result is a metadata-rich, full-text collection of theses that can be constructed for little out of pocket cost.
    • Working Together: Librarian and Student Collaboration Through Active Learning in a Library Eclassroom

      Jacklin, Marcie; Pfaff, Heather (2010)
      Active learning strategies based on several learning theories were incorporated during instruction sessions for second year Biological Sciences students. The instructional strategies described in this paper are based primarily on sociocultural and collaborative learning theory, with the goal being to expand the relatively small body of literature currently available that discusses the application of these learning theories to library instruction. The learning strategies employed successfully involved students in the learning process ensuring that the experiences were appropriate and effective. The researchers found that, as a result of these strategies (e.g. teaching moments based on the emerging needs of students) students’ interest in learning information literacy was increased and students interacted with information given to them as well as with their peers. Collaboration between the Librarians, Co-op Student and Senior Lab Instructor helped to enhance the learning experience for students and also revealed new aspects of the active learning experiences. The primary learning objective, which was to increase the students’ information skills in the Biological Sciences, was realized. The advantages of active learning were realized by both instructors and students. Advantages for students attained during these sessions include having their diverse learning styles addressed; increased interaction with and retention of information; increased responsibility for their own learning; the opportunity to value not only the instructors, but also themselves and their peers as sources of authority and knowledge; improved problem solving abilities; increased interest and opportunities for critical thinking, as a result of the actively exchanging information in a group. The primary advantage enjoyed by the instructors was the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to reduce the preparation required to create effective library instruction sessions. Opportunities for further research were also discovered, including the degree to which “social loafing” plays a role in collaborative, active learning.
    • Interaction and knowledge exchange among academic business librarians in Ontario

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (2010-01-06)
      Academic business librarians specialize in the provision of library services to business faculty and students but often assume these roles without an educational background in Business or a familiarity with business information. This study used a two phase multi-method research design (web-based questionnaire followed by interviews) to investigate the communication, information seeking, and continuing professional education (CPE) activities of a population of academic business librarians in Ontario into order to develop a better understanding of how they acquire and share knowledge related to their professional practice and to determine if they constitute a community of practice.
    • Is Library Database Searching a Language Learning Activity?

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2010-05)
      A qualitative research study that asked international students how they thought of words to enter into a library database to see if language learning was also involved.
    • International Activities of Canadian Librarians

      Bordonaro, Karen (Canadian Library Association, 2010-12)
      Guest editorial for themed issue on international activities of Canadian librarians.
    • Incorporating Language Skills Strategies into Library Instruction for ESL Students

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2011-04)
      a self-reflection study of the incorporation of language skills strategies in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a library instruction classroom setting
    • Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (The Reading Matrix, 2011-09)
      survey of international students in a university library as to whether or not they engage in recreational reading and if they think it helps their language learning
    • Book Review: Pirate Cinema

      Ribaric, Tim (2600 Enterprises, Inc., 2013)
      Book Review of 'Pirate Cinema' written by Cory Doctorow.
    • Evolution of Various Library Instruction Strategies: Using Student Feedback to Create and Enhance Online Active Learning Assignments

      Jacklin, Marcie; Robinson, Keely (2013)
      This case study traces the evolution of library assignments for biological science students from paper-based workbooks in a blended (hands-on) workshop to blended learning workshops using online assignments to online active learning modules which are stand-alone without any face-to-face instruction. As the assignments evolved to adapt to online learning supporting materials in the form of PDFs (portable document format), screen captures and screencasting were embedded into the questions as teaching moments to replace face-to-face instruction. Many aspects of the evolution of the assignment were based on student feedback from evaluations, input from senior lab demonstrators and teaching assistants, and statistical analysis of the students’ performance on the assignment. Advantages and disadvantages of paper-based and online assignments are discussed. An important factor for successful online learning may be the ability to get assistance.
    • Extraterrestrial Human Geographies

      Whipple, Heather (2013-06)
      In 2007, Fraser MacDonald put out a call for human geographers to get involved in space studies research, given the ways that geopolitical systems on Earth are likely to affect the future uses of outer space by those groups that can access it. Hoping to jumpstart a critical geography of outer space, MacDonald argues that human geography’s advances in analysing the concept of space as socially produced, as a system or network of interrelationships, and as an arena for social justice, make human geography particularly able to engage with concerns relating to current and future human activities beyond our home planet. By examining how human geographers have already engaged with outer space and then looking more closely at how geographical theories of place intersect with a selection of representations of human engagement with outer space, this project extends MacDonald’s foundation to be a launch pad for continued research into the cultural geographies of extraterrestrial spaces.
    • Visualize your doppelgänger: using information graphics to benchmark AACSB-accredited business schools.

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (Special Libraries Association, 2013-06-10)
      A poster presented at the 2013 SLA Annual Conference, Business & Finance Division poster session, June 10, 2013 in San Diego, CA.
    • Practically Speaking

      Bordonaro, Karen (Canadian Library Association, 2013-12)
      a list of practical tips to enhance one-on-one encounters with international students at library service desks