• Librarians and ESL Instructors as Campus Partners in Collaboration and Alliance Building

      Bordonaro, Karen (Collaborative Librarianship, 2018-06)
      Librarians and English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors can be campus partners to improve student learning. This article describes one way for librarians to begin working collaboratively with their ESL instructor counterparts on a university campus. It offers the creation and use of an assessment tool designed to capture ESL students’ library learning as an initial point of collaboration. Following the discussion of the creation and use of this tool, this article then advocates for librarians and ESL instructors to build mutually beneficial alliances between them. These alliances can be based on commonalities and can offer benefits for professionals working in both roles on campus.
    • Libraries and the Arctic: Language Education Support

      Bordonaro, Karen; Angalik, Shelby (LIBREAS: Library Ideas, 2018-05)
      The Arctic inspires awe. This unique region of the world has been studied in many ways by many different disciplines. The discipline of librarianship can also add to its study. In this article, the authors, a practicing Canadian librarian at Brock University in Ontario and an Inuktitut student enrolled at the same university, offer a suggested role for libraries to play in the ongoing study of the Arctic. They explore and describe the role of libraries in supporting native Arctic language education. Support for learning and preserving native Arctic languages can be found in library collections, spaces and services. This article looks at support of native speakers and other interested language learners, support of language research, support of language preservation, and support of new publishing opportunities that can be provided by or through libraries. These language support examples come from a document analysis that perused web sites, conference proceedings, published scholarship in the form of books and articles, newspaper sources, and personal background knowledge of the authors. Documents were collected, categorized, and described. The language support categories that emerged illustrate the many different ways that libraries can engage in native Arctic language education support. In offering this role, the authors hope to provide a means for librarians to learn more about the Arctic as well as a way for libraries to contribute to knowledge of the Arctic.
    • Library Open Access publishing funds

      Yates, Elizabeth (SlideShare, 2014-05)
      Presentation on scope, successes and challenges facing library Open Access publishing funds delivered at the Canadian Association of Learned Journals meeting at Congress 2014, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada. Focus on Canada but also some info on the U.S.
    • Licensing, Demystified

      Gibson, Ian (2019-02)
      Slides from 2019 OLA Conference presentation
    • Multiple Roles of Librarians

      Alsop, Justine; Bordonaro, Karen (Electronic Journal of Academic and Special Librarianship, 2007)
      a survey of academic librarians investigating other roles on campus they may work in besides that of librarian (ex. ESL teacher, aerobics instructor)
    • Open Access funds: getting a bigger bang for our bucks

      Yates, Elizabeth; Hampson, Crystal; Moore, Patricia; Glushko, Robert (2015-11)
    • Open Access funds: getting a bigger bang for our bucks

      Yates, Elizabeth; Hampson, Crystal; Moore, Patricia; Glushko, Robert (Charleston Library Conference 2015, 2015-11)
      Many libraries offer open access publishing funds to support authors in paying article processing charges (APC) levied by some OA journals. However, there are few standard practices for managing or assessing these funds. The Open Access Working Group (OAWG) of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) was asked to investigate and articulate best practices for successful open access fund management. In spring 2015, the OAWG surveyed Canadian academic libraries with OA funds to review their criteria and collect feedback on current practices. The survey proved timely because many OA funds are under review. Shrinking budgets, ending pilots, and questions around scale and sustainability of funds provide context for some institutions revisiting or reconfiguring these funds. At the same time, Canada’s principal funding agencies have issued the new Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications (effective May 2015) which mandates open access for funded research and which is increasing the demand from researchers for financial support from their institutions to pay APCs and other OA costs. This paper addresses findings of the survey, some best practices for open access publishing fund management, counter-arguments for OA funds, as well as other strategies developed by international agencies including SPARC.
    • Overcoming Language Barriers for Non-Native Speakers of English: Learner Autonomy in Academic Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2019)
      The purpose of this chapter is to give librarians a brief overview of the theory of learner autonomy and to explain how fostering its presence in libraries can help overcome language barriers for non-native speakers of English.
    • Perceptions of Technology and Manifestations of Language Learner Autonomy

      Bordonaro, Karen (Computer-Assisted Language Learning Electronic Journal, 2003-06)
      a grounded theory study investigating perceptions of technology by learners of English as a second language
    • The perfect space: classroom environments and learning outcomes

      Yates, Elizabeth; Cotton, Justine (2015-01-27)
      What impact does a classroom space have on learning outcomes for students? Does a perfect library teaching space exist? This presentation highlights the findings of a 2014 survey of teaching librarians and library staff at Ontario universities and colleges exploring the effect of library/learning commons learning spaces on instructional design and learning outcomes.
    • Personal Librarians: can we help with student retention?

      Yates, Elizabeth (2018-03)
      A strong body of research shows positive correlations between use of library resources and student success amd retention. Research on retention also shows the importance of students feeling connected to their university community. Personal librarian programs address both of those outcomes by promoting the use of library services and resources and by building positive relationships between students and their librarians. This lightning talk will describe a new personal librarian program aimed at improving student retention rates at Brock University in Ontario, Canada, where the university’s retention rates are below the provincial average and increasing retention is a campus priority.
    • Practically Speaking

      Bordonaro, Karen (Canadian Library Association, 2013-12)
      a list of practical tips to enhance one-on-one encounters with international students at library service desks
    • Protect yourself from Predatory Publishers: Tips for staying safe in Scholarly Publishing

      Yates, Elizabeth; Gibson, Ian (2015-04-14)
      Scholarly publishing is a chaotic business with new journals constantly emerging and longstanding publications changing or folding. With some newer publications adopting less-than-desirable business practices, it can be challenging to make wise publishing decisions. This hands-on workshop will explore tools to help you avoid predatory publishers and select journals that will enhance your work.
    • Publish, don’t perish: tips for evaluating journals

      Yates, Elizabeth (2018-06-12)
      So, you want make sure you publish your research in a “good” journal? Maybe your role includes advising others on how to select appropriate publication venues? It’s tricky navigating the complex and rapidly shifting terrain of scholarly publishing, where traditional hallmarks of quality such as Impact Factor no longer reign supreme. The rise of predatory journals makes the publishing environment even more challenging. This session explored strategies for evaluating the quality and relevance of academic journals, maximize the reach of one’s research and avoiding problematic publications.
    • Recreational Reading of International Students in Academic Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (The Reading Matrix, 2011-09)
      survey of international students in a university library as to whether or not they engage in recreational reading and if they think it helps their language learning
    • Redux: Tabulating Transactions with Raspberry Pi and Visualizing Results

      Ribaric, Tim (code4Lib, 2018-05-07)
      Often in the library tech world we are not given the opportunity to attempt a project again. Effort spent re-doing a previous project in a different way, in some sense, means wasting time that could be used to work on new initiatives. This article describes a redux of a project, a revenge story so to speak. In 2013 the Arduino based Tabulatron first entered production at Brock University Library. The device had its flaws, an attempt to rectify those flaws was manifested in the creation of the PiTab, the story of which is presented here.
    • Revolution or evolution? Lessons learned from a business syllabus study.

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (Special Libraries Association, Business & Finance Division, 2015-06-16)
      Although the business school student population at Brock University was growing, requests for traditional in-class information literacy instruction (ILI) sessions were declining as faculty made room in the curriculum for ‘service learning’. I conducted a comprehensive syllabus study of the undergraduate business curriculum in order to better understand this evolving instructional environment. My primary objective was to investigate the research, data, and library use expectations of business school faculty for their undergraduate students, to gain deeper insight into the extent and nature of research-intensive assignments, including those with a service learning component. My secondary objective was to identify new instructional opportunities in order to be strategic in my outreach efforts. A total of 257 syllabi from 86 courses (representing 91% of all course offerings) were rated according to a 5-point scale of prescribed research, data, or library use. Initial analysis identified 38 different courses with significant research expectations, including 13 courses with a service learning component. A comparison of the 38 research-intensive courses against my own ILI statistics identified 26 courses (including 10 service learning courses) for follow up contact. I hope to devise a plan to provide more relevant and responsive ILI support for these research-intensive courses. As a result of this syllabus study, I now have a much better understanding of the undergraduate business curriculum, and where I might add value, in order to revolutionize my ILI practice.
    • Scaling up research data services: a saga of organizational redesign gone awry

      Lowry, Linda (IASSIST, 2021-05-17)
      An academic library may initiate organizational renewal and redesign in order to better pursue new strategic priorities. In the case of the Brock University Library, one of these priorities was active engagement throughout the research life cycle. The draft organizational design framework proposed the creation of a new unit that takes a holistic life cycle approach to research, including data literacy, research data management and other services. Unfortunately, it also called for the elimination of the role of subject liaison librarians, who would be redeployed in other ways. No one was more shocked at this turn of events than me, because as the Business and Economics Librarian, I know how crucial it is to understand the disciplinary landscape with respect to research practices in order to develop research data services that align with researcher needs. This study provides evidence for the discipline-specific needs of business and economics researchers for data reference, data literacy, and data retrieval assistance, derived from a content analysis of graduate student theses and a review of consultation statistics. Will this evidence be sufficient to preserve this role, or will this become a saga of organizational redesign gone awry?
    • Scholarship as a Conversation: A Metaphor for Librarian-ESL Instructor Collaboration

      Bordonaro, Karen (2015)
      Invoking the metaphor of scholarship as a conversation offers academic librarians an excellent way to connect information literacy to university ESL (English as a second language) classes. This article describes how this particular metaphor has appeared in the literature of librarianship, and it suggests that this metaphor offers a deeper way to understand and promote information literacy to ESL students. It connects this deeper understanding of information literacy to ESL writing and speaking instructional approaches. These approaches include understanding scholarship as both a formal written end product and as a writing process in the creation, production and dissemination of knowledge. In addition, understanding scholarship as a conversation is described as including recognition of both formal and informal means of communication. Practical examples of classroom activities are also offered that librarians can use to support these different ways of illustrating scholarship as a conversation. Collaboration between librarians and instructors is advocated in order to fully invoke this metaphor as a way to connect information literacy to ESL classrooms.