• Gathering Library data and creating visualizations the easy way!

      Ribaric, Tim (2018-02-02)
      Statistics and visualizations are important tools Libraries use to tell their stories. This poster will present a statistics capturing and display package that runs on the bare minimum: Google Forms, D3, and HTML. The features of the platform will be showcased with data collected from the Brock University Library.
    • Git It Done with GitHub: Digital Scholarship with Open Tools

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-06-03)
      Presentation material from Lightning Talk done at Digital Odyssey, 2019. Held in North York Central Library. Event sponsored and organized by Ontario Library and Information Technology (OLITA), a division of Ontario Library Association (OLA)
    • How To Fulfil All Our Lending and (Our Patrons’) Borrowing Dreams

      Taves, Adam; Whidden, Linda; Gibson, Ian (Ontario Library Association Super Conference 2020, 2020-01-29)
      Collaborative Futures (CF), a project to implement a shared library system for 14 Ontario universities, is about radical collaboration. The CF Shared Resources Working Group will discuss dreaming big to create, sell, and implement a vision of long and liberal loan policies, minimal fines, and easy cross-consortium borrowing.
    • I didn't become a worse Librarian when I became a Grad Student

      Ribaric, Tim (2017-05-11)
      Presentation made at code4Lib North 2017 at University of Ottawa. Looks at the process and reflections of continuing education and graduate studies for mature students.
    • Incorporating Language Skills Strategies into Library Instruction for ESL Students

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2011-04)
      a self-reflection study of the incorporation of language skills strategies in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a library instruction classroom setting
    • Interaction and knowledge exchange among academic business librarians in Ontario

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (2010-01-06)
      Academic business librarians specialize in the provision of library services to business faculty and students but often assume these roles without an educational background in Business or a familiarity with business information. This study used a two phase multi-method research design (web-based questionnaire followed by interviews) to investigate the communication, information seeking, and continuing professional education (CPE) activities of a population of academic business librarians in Ontario into order to develop a better understanding of how they acquire and share knowledge related to their professional practice and to determine if they constitute a community of practice.
    • International Activities of Canadian Librarians

      Bordonaro, Karen (Canadian Library Association, 2010-12)
      Guest editorial for themed issue on international activities of Canadian librarians.
    • Internationalization in German Academic Libraries: Moving beyond North American Perspectives

      Bordonaro, Karen; Rauchmann, Sabine (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015-10)
      This paper explores how internationalization is understood and experienced in German academic libraries. Its main purpose is to move the discussion of internationalization in academic libraries beyond the boundaries of English-speaking North America by investigating a European perspective. Its secondary purpose is to investigate the role of English in German academic libraries. An online survey and a series of in-person interviews conducted in Germany in April 2015 provided the data for this study. What emerged are a series of stated differences and similarities between North America and Germany informed by the two overarching themes of implicit internationalization and plurilingualism, the ability to switch from one language to another as required.
    • Is Library Database Searching a Language Learning Activity?

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2010-05)
      A qualitative research study that asked international students how they thought of words to enter into a library database to see if language learning was also involved.
    • Librarians and ESL Instructors as Campus Partners in Collaboration and Alliance Building

      Bordonaro, Karen (Collaborative Librarianship, 2018-06)
      Librarians and English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors can be campus partners to improve student learning. This article describes one way for librarians to begin working collaboratively with their ESL instructor counterparts on a university campus. It offers the creation and use of an assessment tool designed to capture ESL students’ library learning as an initial point of collaboration. Following the discussion of the creation and use of this tool, this article then advocates for librarians and ESL instructors to build mutually beneficial alliances between them. These alliances can be based on commonalities and can offer benefits for professionals working in both roles on campus.
    • Libraries and the Arctic: Language Education Support

      Bordonaro, Karen; Angalik, Shelby (LIBREAS: Library Ideas, 2018-05)
      The Arctic inspires awe. This unique region of the world has been studied in many ways by many different disciplines. The discipline of librarianship can also add to its study. In this article, the authors, a practicing Canadian librarian at Brock University in Ontario and an Inuktitut student enrolled at the same university, offer a suggested role for libraries to play in the ongoing study of the Arctic. They explore and describe the role of libraries in supporting native Arctic language education. Support for learning and preserving native Arctic languages can be found in library collections, spaces and services. This article looks at support of native speakers and other interested language learners, support of language research, support of language preservation, and support of new publishing opportunities that can be provided by or through libraries. These language support examples come from a document analysis that perused web sites, conference proceedings, published scholarship in the form of books and articles, newspaper sources, and personal background knowledge of the authors. Documents were collected, categorized, and described. The language support categories that emerged illustrate the many different ways that libraries can engage in native Arctic language education support. In offering this role, the authors hope to provide a means for librarians to learn more about the Arctic as well as a way for libraries to contribute to knowledge of the Arctic.
    • Library Open Access publishing funds

      Yates, Elizabeth (SlideShare, 2014-05)
      Presentation on scope, successes and challenges facing library Open Access publishing funds delivered at the Canadian Association of Learned Journals meeting at Congress 2014, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada. Focus on Canada but also some info on the U.S.
    • Licensing, Demystified

      Gibson, Ian (2019-02)
      Slides from 2019 OLA Conference presentation
    • Multiple Roles of Librarians

      Alsop, Justine; Bordonaro, Karen (Electronic Journal of Academic and Special Librarianship, 2007)
      a survey of academic librarians investigating other roles on campus they may work in besides that of librarian (ex. ESL teacher, aerobics instructor)
    • Open Access funds: getting a bigger bang for our bucks

      Yates, Elizabeth; Hampson, Crystal; Moore, Patricia; Glushko, Robert (2015-11)
    • Open Access funds: getting a bigger bang for our bucks

      Yates, Elizabeth; Hampson, Crystal; Moore, Patricia; Glushko, Robert (Charleston Library Conference 2015, 2015-11)
      Many libraries offer open access publishing funds to support authors in paying article processing charges (APC) levied by some OA journals. However, there are few standard practices for managing or assessing these funds. The Open Access Working Group (OAWG) of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) was asked to investigate and articulate best practices for successful open access fund management. In spring 2015, the OAWG surveyed Canadian academic libraries with OA funds to review their criteria and collect feedback on current practices. The survey proved timely because many OA funds are under review. Shrinking budgets, ending pilots, and questions around scale and sustainability of funds provide context for some institutions revisiting or reconfiguring these funds. At the same time, Canada’s principal funding agencies have issued the new Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications (effective May 2015) which mandates open access for funded research and which is increasing the demand from researchers for financial support from their institutions to pay APCs and other OA costs. This paper addresses findings of the survey, some best practices for open access publishing fund management, counter-arguments for OA funds, as well as other strategies developed by international agencies including SPARC.
    • Overcoming Language Barriers for Non-Native Speakers of English: Learner Autonomy in Academic Libraries

      Bordonaro, Karen (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2019)
      The purpose of this chapter is to give librarians a brief overview of the theory of learner autonomy and to explain how fostering its presence in libraries can help overcome language barriers for non-native speakers of English.
    • Perceptions of Technology and Manifestations of Language Learner Autonomy

      Bordonaro, Karen (Computer-Assisted Language Learning Electronic Journal, 2003-06)
      a grounded theory study investigating perceptions of technology by learners of English as a second language