• Beyond CRAAP: Critical Thinking in the Age of Fake News

      Thiessen, Jennifer; MacKinnon, Colleen; Pemberton, Amanda (2019-01-30)
      In this age of fake news, clickbait, and alternative facts, how can we equip students to find the truth? While fake news is not a new concept, its ubiquity has made it increasingly difficult to distinguish between what is real and what is fabricated. Library professionals have long been in the business of teaching critical thinking and source evaluation. How can we leverage this knowledge to teach students to be confident information consumers and creators? This session will review online learning content created by librarians at Brock University, including a media literacy tutorial for students in the Teacher Education program, and an online workshop on identifying fake news and critically evaluating news information. We will explore the importance of teaching media literacy and critical thinking skills, outline strategies for moving beyond the checklist approach to evaluating information, and share successes, challenges and next steps.
    • Book Review: Pirate Cinema

      Ribaric, Tim (2600 Enterprises, Inc., 2013)
      Book Review of 'Pirate Cinema' written by Cory Doctorow.
    • Bridging the business data divide: insights into primary and secondary data use by business researchers

      Lowry, Linda Darlene (International Association for Social Science Information Services & Technology, 2015-09)
      Academic librarians and data specialists use a variety of approaches to gain insight into how researcher data needs and practices vary by discipline, including surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Some published studies included small numbers of business school faculty and graduate students in their samples, but provided little, if any, insight into variations within the business discipline. Business researchers employ a variety of research designs and data collection methods and engage in quantitative and qualitative data analysis. The purpose of this paper is to provide deeper insight into primary and secondary data use by business graduate students at one Canadian university based on a content analysis of a corpus of 32 Master of Science in Management theses. This paper explores variations in research designs and data collection methods between and within business subfields (e.g., accounting, finance, operations and information systems, marketing, or organization studies) in order to better understand the extent to which these researchers collect and analyze primary data or secondary data sources, including commercial or open data sources. The results of this analysis will inform the work of data specialists and liaison librarians who provide research data management services for business school researchers.
    • Brock’s New Digital Scholarship Lab: Partnering and Collaborating for Success

      Nolan, Nicole; Robertson, Mark; Ribaric, Tim (2019-02-01)
      Brock University will open a new SIF-funded facility in the spring of 2019 dedicated to transdisciplinary research, commercialization and entrepreneurship. The new Rankin Family Pavilion at the front door of the campus is home to Brock LINC, a collaborative approach to innovation. Brock Library's Digital Scholarship Lab and Makerspace will join other units in the facility, such as BioLINC (incubator), the Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute’s Virtual Reality Consumer Lab, the Goodman School of Business Consulting Group, and the Centre for Innovation, Management and Enterprise Education (CIMEE). This session will focus on the role of the Digital Scholarship Lab (DSL) within the context of this new innovation ecosystem. Digital scholarship is by its nature collaborative, multi-disciplinary and draws upon a broad range of expertise in areas such as data science, research data management, high performance computing (HPC), data visualization, virtual objects and simulations, geospatial technologies, and computational textual analysis. The Digital Scholarship Lab in the new facility will be a hub to explore, discover, create, and play with data and visual tools, methods, and objects. Programming, is offered by the Library in partnership with central IT, Brock's Compute Canada/SharcNet representative, and the Centre for Digital Humanities. We also collaborate with the other Brock LINC units. Drawing on technical expertise from both inside and outside of our own domain enables us to offer a more robust suite of services for our users. Attendees of this session will: 1) learn about models of digital scholarship, 2) learn about the role of collaboration and partnering in an innovation ecosystem, and 3) learn about some of the challenges of developing a digital program in a collaborative context. Presentation Material from Ontario Library Association (OLA) Superconference 2019.
    • Business data: issues and challenges from the Canadian perspective

      Lowry, Linda; Hong, Eun-ha (IASSIST, 2008-08-15)
      This paper explores the issues and challenges that we have faced as Canadian academic business librarians when working with business data. As this is an exploratory study, we hope only to start a discussion among data librarians about some key challenges facing the academic community related to supporting the teaching and research use of business data. Our paper begins with a brief discussion of general data trends, followed by a detailed exploration of business data trends and trends in Canadian business education. We discuss challenges and issues related to working with business data from both the collections and reference service perspectives, including the pros and cons of providing business data services and support within the library environment. We conclude by suggesting some measures that both academic business librarians and data librarians can take to address some of these challenges.
    • C

      Ribaric, Tim (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016-06)
      This is chapter 8 of "The Librarian's Introduction to Programming Languages" entitled C. It introduces the C language in a context suitable for Librarians and information professionals.
    • Canada's new Open Access policy: Integrating libraries into open scholarship

      Burpee, Jane; Coughlan, Rosarie; Johnston, Dave; Moore, Patricia; Yates, Elizabeth (2016-01)
    • Canada’s new Open Access Policy: what does it mean for Brock researchers?

      Yates, Elizabeth; Ribaric, Tim (2015-04-14)
      Canada’s new Tri-Agency Open Access Policy signals that Canada is embracing open research as a default position. While only funding recipients will be required to comply with the policy by making their journal articles Open Access, the policy stresses that all Canadian researchers are encouraged to follow suit. Attend this session to learn more about the policy regulations and how the Library can support Open Access to Brock research.
    • Cluster Computing for Humans -OR- Have you heard of this HPCPack?

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-05-30)
      Presentation material from code4Lib North 2019, held at McMaster.
    • Codifying Academic Freedom: An Examination of Collective Agreements for Librarian Specific Language

      Ribaric, Tim (2018-05-30)
      Academic Freedom is a foundational component of the modern University. The notion is brought to life and exercised through a very particular article of the collective agreement. This article almost always provides a well honed, lofty, and almost self-evident description of the protections to teaching, and research that need to be maintained. Challenging ideas in the classroom are shielded from the reluctant hang wringing of administrators. Research that pushes boundaries and challenges norms proceeds with a slow march for the betterment of all. Our traditional Faculty colleagues conduct their business with full confidence that their activities are well protected, yet what about us as Professional Librarians? In most cases we can rely on this same exact article to afford protections. This is of course due to the fact that we are in the same bargaining units as those traditional Faculty members and are bound to the language as well. Yet, when pressed, does this language really offer protections to Professional Librarians that are specific to the work they conduct? A judicious application of teaching and research for the traditional Faculty member is hard to parallel with certain core Librarian duties. Where does collection development fit? Collaborating on an in-depth research consultation that might unearth ideas contrary to what the institution holds as fundamental? In some cases the collective agreement is silent on these activities. While most would view these types of conduct allowable under the spirit of academic freedom it is possible that a strict interpretation would exclude these endeavours from established protections. Fortunately this is not always the case, and as time progresses breaks to this trend develop. A selection of collective agreements of Canadian universities now have specific provisions for the conduct of Professional Librarians under the overarching concept of Academic Freedom. This paper will attempt to present this landscape by examining text from collective agreements of Canadian institutions to see how (if at all) protections for Librarians are constructed.
    • Collegial Self-Governance for Professional Librarians: A Look at the Advantages of the Establishment of a Library Council and its Role in the Lives of the Librarians in the Brock University Faculty Association

      Ribaric, Tim (Litwin Books, LLC, 2014)
      The ability to perform collegial governance is a cornerstone of modern universities in the United States and Canada. This idea of governance is well practiced among faculty members but is not often practiced to the same extent with librarians in those same institutions. In this chapter, I will look at a popular form of collegial governance called the Library Council. Further, I will examine how the Library Council at Brock University has enabled librarians there to perform meaningful collegial self-governance.
    • A Community Without a Space: Digital Scholarship at Brock University

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-08-01)
      The Digital Scholarship Lab at Brock University was originally set to open in the fall of 2018. However, the opening was delayed to the following summer. What that meant is that during the last academic year digital scholarship support has been provided by a nomadic team, relying on convincing ideas and compelling project work to increase the profile of the service. This session will look at the trajectory of that year and the many services that were piloted despite the lack of any physical footprint.
    • Copyright in the Stacks: The Chilling Effects of Unclear Copyright Interpretations in the Canadian Academic Library

      Ribaric, Tim (2015-01-21)
      The Canadian academic library is often seen as a vibrant place where the creation and sharing of knowledge plays a pivotal role in the intellectual life of the University. However this longstanding tradition is slowing being eroded by changes in copyright legislation and through infringement claims from content creators. Libraries are increasingly being placed in situations where they are expected to provide access to licensed material without clear ideas on what acceptable terms of use accompany those materials. Due to this lack of clarity Libraries are rescinding key services and being forced to spend ever increasing amounts to ensure proper licensing fees and usage rights are established. This paper will describe the current landscape surrounding this phenomenon and shed light on the chilling effects of these unclear interpretations. These results will be then be contrasted against the gains that Libraries have been making on behalf of their users in terms of advocacy and education in alternative forms of copyright.
    • DESIGN SPRINTS AND DIRECT EXPERIMENTATION: DIGITAL HUMANITIES MUSIC PEDAGOGY AT A SMALL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE

      Murgu, Cal (Music Library Association, 2021-06)
      In this essay, we detail the pedagogical collaboration between a digital humanities librarian, a professor of music and digital media, and a second-year music student that took the form of a design sprint. The product of the design sprint was the Mapping Sentiments through Music (MStM) application. Using this project as a case study, we argue that both digital humanities and music education share a commonality: both disciplines can incorporate elements of design thinking to be successful. As a result, our efforts center direct experimentation with a team, and foster design thinking by promoting descriptive exchange, creative problem solving, and the creation of emergent rather than explicitly delimited meanings. We conclude with several remarks on overlaps between music and design pedagogy, and on librarian-faculty collaborations. This article was published in the Music Library Association’s journal, Notes 77, 4, June 2021, and 561-585. The version of record is available at https://proxy.library.brocku.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=150204301&site=ehost-live&scope=site. This material may not be copied or reposted without written permission of MLA
    • Diving into the ACRL Framework: Engaging Graduate Students with Threshold Concepts

      2015-06-16
      Librarians face many challenges when planning instruction for graduate students. Masters and PhD students typically arrive in their programs with wide ranging research skills and backgrounds. They may have assumptions about how research should be conducted or, conversely, they may feel out of their depth in the research of their discipline. The nature of threshold concepts—that they are transformative, integrative, irreversible, bounded, and troublesome—make them an ideal way to connect with students at the graduate level. Not only can librarians use these concepts to inform their teaching, but they can use threshold concepts to challenge and engage students in their thinking about how research is created, produced, and disseminated in their field(s). Join Brock University liaison librarians Jennifer Thiessen and Justine Cotton as they share how they have integrated concepts from the Framework into library workshops for graduate students. Jennifer has successfully used several of the threshold concepts to rework thinking among educators about critical thinking and credibility assessment. As co-instructor for a second-year PhD Humanities course, Justine has incorporated the threshold concepts into the design of three library workshops on the topics of resource discovery, information management, and publishing. While the instructional content does not change significantly, incorporating threshold concepts paves the way for deeper understanding, provocative discussions, and a more collegial atmosphere.
    • Drop-In Clinics for Environmental Studies Students

      Jacklin, Marcie; Bordonaro, Karen (2008)
      The delivery of library instruction to students in those areas of the sciences and the social sciences dealing with biology and the environment has a long history (Bowden & Di Benedetto 2001; Kutner 2000; Kutner & Danks 2007; Sapp 2006; Sinn 1998). Often these instruction sessions take the form of a one hour lecture or workshop at the start of a semester before the students have begun their projects or papers. This "one-shot" approach, though popular, has its limitations. It may not be offered at a time when the students will actually start making use of library resources, it may not be tied very specifically to a particular assignment, or it may be too general in nature to be of much use to students later on when they need to look at particular topics in much more depth than can be addressed in one such session. The following article describes another approach: the strategic use of drop-in clinics as a method of instruction in which the students themselves determine how the instruction proceeds.
    • The End of Libraries and Librarianship - Part 34

      Gordon, Ian D. (The Informed Librarian Online, 2021-01-04)
      Librarians have bemoaned the constant clatter overheard from commentators that libraries are obsolete and no longer relevant. This observation is contrary to the lived experiences of those that serve in and depend upon public and academic libraries. A call to action challenges librarians everywhere to change this narrative by intentionally sharing stories of their essential work, service, community building… with anyone who will listen. An annotated list of readings and streaming videos is provided that builds on the inspirational work of David Lankes, Lisa Peet, Lance Werner, Mark Smith, Shamichael Hallman, Catherine Murray-Must, Michael Stephens and others. Libraries are observed to be places of transformative change. Librarians are found to be passionate, courageous and indispensable. Story telling is a powerful instrument for librarians and people that volunteer and serve in libraries to make the seemingly invisible work of libraries - more visible.
    • Engaging Faculty to Advance Campus Open Access Policies: Strategies and Lessons Learned

      Yates, Elizabeth; Kirchner, Joy; Robertson, Mark (2019-01-30)
      As champions of creating more equitable systems for sharing scholarly research, libraries are typically the leaders in developing open access policies at their institutions. This work aligns with evidence that effective policies can accelerate researchers’ adoption of open access and increase their rates of open access publishing/archiving. The benefits of Institutional open access policies include increasing public access to taxpayer-funded research, enhancing the visibility and impact of an institution’s research output and supporting author rights. While increasing numbers of institutions are adopting these policies, they are often a tough sell due to misconceptions about open access and concerns about infringing on faculty's academic freedom to publish where they please. Presenters and participants will discuss strategies for working with stakeholders to overcome barriers and create buy-in for openly sharing research. Participants will learn of models and tools for open access policy development and presenters will share insights and campus engagement strategies from their development of institutional open access policies at York University and Brock University.
    • ESL Collections, University Libraries, and Internationalization

      Bordonaro, Karen (LEAA (Lenguas en Aprendizaje Autodirigido) Revista Electronica, 2015-03)
      This research study examines the content, types of materials, locations, and library collection development policies concerning ESL (English as a second language) materials collections on university campuses in the United States and Canada. ESL learning materials are defined in this study as those materials supporting adult learners who are non-native speakers of English in a higher education setting. The purpose of this study is to describe the content and types of materials in these collections, to learn where these collections are typically housed on university campuses, to discover what collection development policies may inform the building of these collections, and to explore the potential significance of these collections for university libraries. The overriding question that informs this study is the following: Can involvement with ESL collections serve as a way for university libraries to participate in internationalization by supporting the language needs of international students?
    • Evolution of Various Library Instruction Strategies: Using Student Feedback to Create and Enhance Online Active Learning Assignments

      Jacklin, Marcie; Robinson, Keely (2013)
      This case study traces the evolution of library assignments for biological science students from paper-based workbooks in a blended (hands-on) workshop to blended learning workshops using online assignments to online active learning modules which are stand-alone without any face-to-face instruction. As the assignments evolved to adapt to online learning supporting materials in the form of PDFs (portable document format), screen captures and screencasting were embedded into the questions as teaching moments to replace face-to-face instruction. Many aspects of the evolution of the assignment were based on student feedback from evaluations, input from senior lab demonstrators and teaching assistants, and statistical analysis of the students’ performance on the assignment. Advantages and disadvantages of paper-based and online assignments are discussed. An important factor for successful online learning may be the ability to get assistance.