• Automatic Preparation of ETD Material from the Internet Archive for the DSpace Repository Platform

      Ribaric, Tim (2009-11-23)
      A big challenge associated with getting an institutional repository off the ground is getting content into it. This article will look at how to use digitization services at the Internet Archive alongside software utilities that the author developed to automate the harvesting of scanned dissertations and associated Dublin Core XML files to create an ETD Portal using the DSpace platform. The end result is a metadata-rich, full-text collection of theses that can be constructed for little out of pocket cost.
    • Brock’s New Digital Scholarship Lab: Partnering and Collaborating for Success

      Nolan, Nicole; Robertson, Mark; Ribaric, Tim (2019-02-01)
      Brock University will open a new SIF-funded facility in the spring of 2019 dedicated to transdisciplinary research, commercialization and entrepreneurship. The new Rankin Family Pavilion at the front door of the campus is home to Brock LINC, a collaborative approach to innovation. Brock Library's Digital Scholarship Lab and Makerspace will join other units in the facility, such as BioLINC (incubator), the Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute’s Virtual Reality Consumer Lab, the Goodman School of Business Consulting Group, and the Centre for Innovation, Management and Enterprise Education (CIMEE). This session will focus on the role of the Digital Scholarship Lab (DSL) within the context of this new innovation ecosystem. Digital scholarship is by its nature collaborative, multi-disciplinary and draws upon a broad range of expertise in areas such as data science, research data management, high performance computing (HPC), data visualization, virtual objects and simulations, geospatial technologies, and computational textual analysis. The Digital Scholarship Lab in the new facility will be a hub to explore, discover, create, and play with data and visual tools, methods, and objects. Programming, is offered by the Library in partnership with central IT, Brock's Compute Canada/SharcNet representative, and the Centre for Digital Humanities. We also collaborate with the other Brock LINC units. Drawing on technical expertise from both inside and outside of our own domain enables us to offer a more robust suite of services for our users. Attendees of this session will: 1) learn about models of digital scholarship, 2) learn about the role of collaboration and partnering in an innovation ecosystem, and 3) learn about some of the challenges of developing a digital program in a collaborative context. Presentation Material from Ontario Library Association (OLA) Superconference 2019.
    • C

      Ribaric, Tim (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016-06)
      This is chapter 8 of "The Librarian's Introduction to Programming Languages" entitled C. It introduces the C language in a context suitable for Librarians and information professionals.
    • Canada’s new Open Access Policy: what does it mean for Brock researchers?

      Yates, Elizabeth; Ribaric, Tim (2015-04-14)
      Canada’s new Tri-Agency Open Access Policy signals that Canada is embracing open research as a default position. While only funding recipients will be required to comply with the policy by making their journal articles Open Access, the policy stresses that all Canadian researchers are encouraged to follow suit. Attend this session to learn more about the policy regulations and how the Library can support Open Access to Brock research.
    • Cluster Computing for Humans -OR- Have you heard of this HPCPack?

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-05-30)
      Presentation material from code4Lib North 2019, held at McMaster.
    • Codifying Academic Freedom: An Examination of Collective Agreements for Librarian Specific Language

      Ribaric, Tim (2018-05-30)
      Academic Freedom is a foundational component of the modern University. The notion is brought to life and exercised through a very particular article of the collective agreement. This article almost always provides a well honed, lofty, and almost self-evident description of the protections to teaching, and research that need to be maintained. Challenging ideas in the classroom are shielded from the reluctant hang wringing of administrators. Research that pushes boundaries and challenges norms proceeds with a slow march for the betterment of all. Our traditional Faculty colleagues conduct their business with full confidence that their activities are well protected, yet what about us as Professional Librarians? In most cases we can rely on this same exact article to afford protections. This is of course due to the fact that we are in the same bargaining units as those traditional Faculty members and are bound to the language as well. Yet, when pressed, does this language really offer protections to Professional Librarians that are specific to the work they conduct? A judicious application of teaching and research for the traditional Faculty member is hard to parallel with certain core Librarian duties. Where does collection development fit? Collaborating on an in-depth research consultation that might unearth ideas contrary to what the institution holds as fundamental? In some cases the collective agreement is silent on these activities. While most would view these types of conduct allowable under the spirit of academic freedom it is possible that a strict interpretation would exclude these endeavours from established protections. Fortunately this is not always the case, and as time progresses breaks to this trend develop. A selection of collective agreements of Canadian universities now have specific provisions for the conduct of Professional Librarians under the overarching concept of Academic Freedom. This paper will attempt to present this landscape by examining text from collective agreements of Canadian institutions to see how (if at all) protections for Librarians are constructed.
    • A Community Without a Space: Digital Scholarship at Brock University

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-08-01)
      The Digital Scholarship Lab at Brock University was originally set to open in the fall of 2018. However, the opening was delayed to the following summer. What that meant is that during the last academic year digital scholarship support has been provided by a nomadic team, relying on convincing ideas and compelling project work to increase the profile of the service. This session will look at the trajectory of that year and the many services that were piloted despite the lack of any physical footprint.
    • Gathering Library data and creating visualizations the easy way!

      Ribaric, Tim (2018-02-02)
      Statistics and visualizations are important tools Libraries use to tell their stories. This poster will present a statistics capturing and display package that runs on the bare minimum: Google Forms, D3, and HTML. The features of the platform will be showcased with data collected from the Brock University Library.
    • Git It Done with GitHub: Digital Scholarship with Open Tools

      Ribaric, Tim (2019-06-03)
      Presentation material from Lightning Talk done at Digital Odyssey, 2019. Held in North York Central Library. Event sponsored and organized by Ontario Library and Information Technology (OLITA), a division of Ontario Library Association (OLA)
    • I didn't become a worse Librarian when I became a Grad Student

      Ribaric, Tim (2017-05-11)
      Presentation made at code4Lib North 2017 at University of Ottawa. Looks at the process and reflections of continuing education and graduate studies for mature students.
    • Redux: Tabulating Transactions with Raspberry Pi and Visualizing Results

      Ribaric, Tim (code4Lib, 2018-05-07)
      Often in the library tech world we are not given the opportunity to attempt a project again. Effort spent re-doing a previous project in a different way, in some sense, means wasting time that could be used to work on new initiatives. This article describes a redux of a project, a revenge story so to speak. In 2013 the Arduino based Tabulatron first entered production at Brock University Library. The device had its flaws, an attempt to rectify those flaws was manifested in the creation of the PiTab, the story of which is presented here.
    • Selling Infrastructure as a Service to faculty

      Ribaric, Tim (2020-10-23)
      Presentation material for session presented at 2020 Access Conference for session entitled Selling Infrastructure as a Service to faculty. Abstract: Libraries aim to provide tools and platforms to support the research enterprise of the institution. This session will look at how a Docker based IAAS service was branded and marketed to researchers. The real challenge was communicating what could be done with the service in a way that avoided jargon and was accessible to introductory users.
    • To Jupyter and Beyond: Computational Notebooks in the Library

      Ribaric, Tim; Brett, Daniel (2020-01-29)
      Have you heard of Jupyter? Better yet, have you heard about how computational notebooks can be used to teach technologies and are part of the reproducible science movement? This session will show you the Juptyer platform and explain why you should know about it.