• Analyse économique de la protection de l’eau de source

      Adamowicz, Vic (2016)
      L’évaluation des services écosystémiques, résultant de stratégies de gestion telles que la protection de l’eau de source (gestion de l’écosystème) comme solution de rechange aux investissements dans les infrastructures (capitaux, coûts d’exploitation), suscite un intérêt considérable dans le monde entier. Cependant, il existe relativement peu d’enquêtes détaillées portant sur ces systèmes. Ce projet propose un cadre conceptuel et jette les bases de l’analyse empirique des avantages économiques et des coûts liés à la protection de l’eau de source. Des partenaires du projet souhaitent connaître la mesure dans laquelle l’aménagement du paysage est susceptible de réduire les coûts de traitement de l’eau ou les risques d’interruption de l’approvisionnement en eau, ainsi que les interactions entre la gestion des services écosystémiques et les exigences relatives à l’investissement de capitaux dans le traitement de l’eau. Ce projet contribue à éclairer ce processus en évaluant les coûts et les avantages des services écosystémiques associés à la qualité et à la quantité de l’eau
    • Analysis of Avoided Water Utility Costs from Wildfire Risk Mitigation

      Emelko, Monica; Price, James; Dupont, Diane; Renzetti, Steven; Adamowicz, Vic (2015)
    • Bottled Water Use On the Land: Economic, Social and Policy Implications of Water Consumption Choices While Pursuing Livelihoods and Undertaking Recreational Activities

      Dupont, Diane; Adamowicz, Vic; Spetch, Marcia; Parlee, Brenda (2015)
      Defensive expenditures on bottled water for home use are related to: incomes, aesthetics (taste, convenience) and health risk perceptions (Dupont and Jahan, 2010; Lloyd-Smith et al., 2014). The previous literature is silent on two issues of relevance to WEPGN’s mandate of improving understanding of water’s role in Canadian society and economy. The first issue is identifying what are the determinants of water consumption choices on the land (particularly, water used in pursuit of livelihoods and/or recreational activities that require travel from home, including trapping, hunting and fishing practices). The second is an investigation of water choices and health risk perceptions of individuals in Canada’s Northern communities. Nickels et al., (2006) notes the use of bottled water by Aboriginal peoples as a substitute for streams/rivers due to perceptions of poor water quality. Project partners are interested in learning whether this is an increasing phenomenon in the Northwest Territories (NWT). This is of concern for two reasons: such expenditures may be wasteful for individuals and also result in potential pollution. The research team will design and implement a survey to elicit perceptions and relate them to defensive expenditures. Researchers will also examine methods for communicating and eliciting risk perceptions to provide the project partners with knowledge to improve communications about water quality. This research will inform decisions around programming, specifically, source water protection planning.
    • Economic Analysis of Source Water Protection

      Adamowicz, Vic; Boxall, Peter; Lloyd-Smith, Pat; Appiah, Alfred; Silins, Uldis (2016)
    • Economic Analysis of Source Water Protection

      Adamowicz, Vic (2016)
      There is considerable interest, worldwide, in the evaluation of ecosystem services arising from management strategies such as source water protection (ecosystem management) as an alternative to infrastructure investments (capital, operating costs). However, there are relatively few detailed investigations of such systems. This project develops a conceptual framework and begins to construct the empirical analysis of the economic benefits and costs of source water protection. Project partners are interested in the extent to which landscape management can reduce water treatment costs and/or the risks of water supply interruptions, as well as how ecosystem service management interacts with capital investment requirements for water treatment. This project helps inform this process by assessing the costs and benefits of ecosystem services associated with water quality and quantity.
    • PUTTING A PRICE ON HOW MUCH ALBERTANS VALUE THE RELIABILITY OF THEIR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY

      Adamowicz, Vic (Canadian Water Network, 2016)
      The importance of safe and reliable drinking water to human health is paramount. Water utility service providers aim to provide quality water to their customers at all times, minimizing disruptions to water systems that may impact the delivery of water. The impacts from increased frequency and severity of summer droughts and forest fires in regions like Alberta are becoming a growing concern, which could lead to increased risks in drinking water system outages or reliability problems (i.e. the interruption of the supply of high quality drinking water) for communities. A vast majority of drinking water in Alberta comes from the Eastern forested slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, and researchers have suggested forest and watershed management as a method of improving drinking water reliability. These practices include the placement of buffer strips along streams to reduce the amount of sediment and debris entering drinking water sources, and reducing of the amount of hazardous forest fuels such as stands of dry trees in the watershed to prevent wildfires. These forest management practices can potentially reduce risks to drinking water reliability and the need for increased investments in drinking water treatment infrastructure.
    • PUTTING A PRICE ON HOW MUCH ALBERTANS VALUE THE RELIABILITY OF THEIR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY

      Adamowicz, Vic (Canadian Water Network, 2016)
      Water utility service providers aim to provide quality water to their customers at all times, minimizing disruptions to water systems that may impact the delivery of water. The impacts from increased frequency and severity of summer droughts and forest fires in regions like Alberta are becoming a growing concern, as they could lead to increased risks in drinking water system outages, and also have negative impacts on downstream water quality. Forest and watershed management practices have the ability to reduce both the risks to the reliability of drinking water sources and the need for increased investments in drinking water treatment infrastructure. An evaluation of the monetary value that Albertans place on the reliability of drinking water sources can assess the economic benefits of forest and watershed management practices in Alberta to inform decision making.