Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMedic, Nikola.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-14T19:42:06Z
dc.date.available2009-07-14T19:42:06Z
dc.date.issued2003-07-14T19:42:06Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/2343
dc.description.abstractThe presence of rewards has been found to undermine intrinsic motivation (Deci & Ryan, 1999). This conclusion is primarily based on research conducted in non-sporting environments. The purpose of this study was to examine perceived motivational changes resulting from the hypothetical manipulation of a reward (i.e., athletic scholarships). Differences in "present" motivation between scholarship and non-scholarship athletes were also assessed. Gender, life roles, and sport experience were also examined in relation to scholarship status. Basketball players from four Ontario (n = 70) and seven U.S. Division I universities (n = 46) were examined. All athletes completed a set of demographic questions, as well as questions from the Sport Motivation Scale (SMS; Pelletier, Fortier, Vallerand, Tuson, Briere, & Blais, 1995) which assessed their "present" motivation. Athletes also completed the SMS to evaluate their "perceived future" motivation based on a hypothetical manipulation of the scholarship status. For Ontario non-scholarship athletes, extrinsic regulation (an extrinsic motive) increased with the introduction of a scholarship and the intrinsic motive to experience stimulation decreased. For U.S. scholarship athletes, the intrinsic motive to accomplish things decreased when scholarships were removed. When the two scholarship status groups were compared across "present" levels of motivation, U.S. scholarship males reported significantly higher levels of introjected regulation compared to Ontario non-scholarship males. Ontario non-scholarship females reported significantly higher levels of introjected regulation compared to U.S. scholarship females. U.S. scholarship athletes reported significantly higher levels of external regulation compared to Ontario non-scholarship athletes. Results offer partial support for self-determination theory. Implications for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectCollege athletesen_US
dc.subjectCollege sportsen_US
dc.subjectSportsen_US
dc.subjectMotivation (Psychology)en_US
dc.titleThe effects of athletic scholarships on motivation in sporten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-16T11:47:01Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Brock_Medic_Hunter_2003.pdf
Size:
3.909Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record