• Composition analysis of high-Tc superconducting thin films by quantitative x-ray fluorescence

      Elsahlli, Tareg.; Department of Physics (Brock University, 1992-07-09)
      A method is presented for determining the composition of thin films containing the elements Bi, Sr, Br, Cu, and Ca. Quantitative x-ray fluorescence (XRF) consisting of radioactive sources (secondary foil excitor 241Am-Mo source and 55Pe source), a Si(Li) detector, and a multichannel analyzer were employed. The XRF system was calibrated by using sol gel thin films of known element composition and also by sputtered thin films analyzed by the conventional Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS). The XRF system has been used to assist and optimize the sputter target composition required to produce high-Tc BiSrCaCuO films with the desired metal composition.
    • Magnetic properties of the Biâ Srâ CaCuâ Oâ single crystal

      Abdussalam, Giamal F.; Department of Physics (Brock University, 1991-07-09)
      The Bi2Sr2CaCu20g single crystal with a superconducting transition temperature equal to 90 ± 2 K was prepared. The irreversibility line of the single crystal for a mgnetic field direction along the c-axis and T* in the ab-plane was determined. The reduced temperature (l - T ) is proportional to H 1.1 for fields below 004 T and proportional to HO.09 for fields above 0.4 T. The zero temperature upper critical field Hc2(0) and coherence length ~ (0) were determined from the magnetization meaurements to be H-lC2=35.9T , H//C2=31.2T, ~c(0)=35.0 A, and ~ab(0)=32.5A,and from the magnetoresistance measurements to be H-lc2 = 134.6T , H//C2=55.5T '~c(0)=38.1 A, and ~ab(0)=2404 A for both directions of the applied magnetic field. The results obtained for Hc2(0) and ~(O) are not reliable due to the rounding that the single crystal exhibits in the magnetization and magnetoresistance curves. The magnetization relaxation of the single crystal was investigated, and was found to be logarithmic in time, and the relaxation rate increases with temperature up to 50 -60 K, then decreases at higher temperatures.