• The performance and strategies of adolescents in learning to read artificial words /

      Whatmough, Deborah A.; Department of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in Education (Brock University, 1991-07-14)
      The present study explored processing strategies used by individuals when they begin to read c;l script. Stimuli were artificial words created from symbols and based on an alphabetic system. The words were.presented to Grade Nine and Ten students, with variations included in the difficulty of orthography and word familiarity, and then scores were recorded on the mean number of trials for defined learning variables. Qualitative findings revealed that subjects 1 earned parts of the visual a'nd auditory features of words prior to hooking up the visual stimulus to the word's name. Performance measures-which appear to affect the rate of learning were as follows: auditory short-term memory, auditory delayed short-term memory, visual delayed short- term memory, and word attack or decod~ng skills. Qualitative data emerging in verbal reports by the subjects revealed that strategies they pefceived to use were, graphic, phonetic decoding and word .reading.
    • Personality type and self-directed learning

      Herbeson, Ellen Frances.; Department of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in Education (Brock University, 1990-07-09)
      This correlational study was designed to investigate the relationship between self-directed learning and personality type. A sample of 133 graduate and undergraduate education students completed the MBTI and the SDLRS. Two hypotheses were examined: (a) scores on the intuitive scale will account for a significant amount of the variance in the prediction of selfdirected learning readiness and, (b) scores on the introverted scale will account for a significant amount of the variance in self-directed learning readiness. Stepwise multiple regression analyses indicated that psychological type accounts for 28% of the variance in self-directed learning. Support for the first hypothesis was found with 15% of the variance in selfdirected learning accounted for by intuition. The second hypothesis was not supported. Introversion accounted for 13% of the variance but in a negative manner. Results of this study indicate that personality type does influence the ability of the learner to be self-directed in studies. These findings add another dimension for the adult educator to consider when attempting to develop self-directedness in learners.