• Single-Molecule Magnets and Multifunctional Molecular Magnetic Materials Based on Polynuclear Metal Complexes

      Alexandropoulos, Dimitrios; Department of Chemistry
      Our work on single molecule magnets and multifunctional magnetic materials is presented in four projects. In the first project we show for first time that heteroatomic-type pseudohalides, such as OCN-, can be employed as structure-directing ligands and ferromagnetic couplers in higher oxidation state metal cluster chemistry. The initial use of cyanato groups in Mn cluster chemistry has afforded structurally interesting MnII/III14 (1) and MnII/III/IV16 (2) clusters in which the end-on bridging cyanates show a preference in binding through their O-atom. The Mn14 compound shows entirely visible out-of-phase alternating currect signals below 5 K and large hysteresis loops below 2 K. Furthermore, the amalgamation of azido groups with the triethanolamine tripodal ligand in manganese carboxylate cluster chemistry has led to the isolation of a new ferromagnetic, high-nuclearity and mixed-valence MnII/III15Na2 (3) cluster with a large ground-state spin value of S = 14. In the second project we demonstrate a new synthetic route to purely inorganic-bridged, transition metal-azido clusters [CoII7 (4) and NiII7 (5)] and coordination polymers [{FeII/III2}n (6)] which exhibit strong ferromagnetic, SMM and long-range magnetic ordering behaviors. We also show that access to such a unique ferromagnetic class of inorganic, N-rich and O-free materials is feasible through the use of Me3SiN3 as the azido-ligand precursor without requiring the addition of any organic chelating/bridging ligand. In the last projects we have tried to bring together molecular magnetism and optics via the synthesis of multifunctional magnetic materials based on 3d- or 4f-metal ions. We decided to approach such challenge from two different directions: firstly, in our third project, by the deliberate replacement of non-emissive carboxylato ligands in known 3d-SMMs with their fluorescent analogues, without perturbing the metal-core structure and SMM properties (complexes 7, 8, and 9). The second route (last project) involves the use of naphthalene or pyridine-based polyalcohol bridging ligands for the synthesis of new polynuclear LnIII metal clusters (Ln = lanthanide) with novel topologies, SMM behaviors and luminescent properties arising from the increased efficiency of the “antenna” organic group. This approach has led us to the isolation of two new families of LnIII8 (complexes 10-13) and LnIII4 (complexes 14-20) clusters.