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dc.contributor.authorCameron, Chantal
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-15T14:33:08Z
dc.date.available2023-06-15T14:33:08Z
dc.date.issued2023-06-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/17867
dc.descriptionIn 1958 Ferranti-Packard was created when the Packard Electric Company of St. Catharines and Ferranti Electrics of Toronto merged. Both companies were well-established and respected manufacturing companies. The Packard Electric Company was incorporated in 1894 and initially operated in the former Neelon Grist Mill on the original Welland Canal. The company was founded by brothers James and William Packard. At first the company produced electric light bulbs but soon expanded to electric motors and transformers. During the first World War Packard ceased to produce light bulbs and motors, and transformers became the major product made by the company. In 1901 the company diversified their product line with an automobile manufacturing plant, where the cars known as “Olds” were produced. The motor car department was located adjacent to the old grist mill. In 1909 the automotive department was sold to the Reo Motor Car Company, but Packard continued to build cars for Reo until 1913. Another product made by Packard Electric were watthour meters which began production in 1902 and continued until 1977. A new plant was constructed in 1951 on the Queen Elizabeth Way to improve the company’s manufacturing facilities. The transition to the new facility was gradually made between 1951 and 1963, at which time all operations were conducted at the new location. The company further expanded with locations added in Trois Rivières, Quebec and Dunkirk, N.Y. The growth of the Ferranti Electrical Company followed a similar trajectory to Packard’s. Ferranti also produced electrical meters and transformers and was based in Toronto. After the two companies merged in 1958, forming Ferranti-Packard Electric Ltd., headquarters were established in Toronto. Mr. T. Edmondson was appointed President and Dr. J.M. Thomson chairman of the Board of Directors. The Power Transformer Division and Electronics Ordnance Division were also in Toronto, while the Distribution Equipment Division was in St. Catharines with another branch in Trois-Rivières. In 1990 the company was acquired by Rolls-Royce Industries Canada Inc. It was later purchased by Siemens. The St. Catharines plant permanently closed in October 2005.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe collection consists of material compiled by Norman Ball while researching a book on the Ferranti-Packard Company with John Vardalas. In 1993 the book was published, titled Ferranti-Packard: Pioneers in Canadian Electrical Manufacturing (HD 9697 C334 F47 1993) . Most of the material are copies and consist of minutes, photographs, correspondence, business proposals, and newspaper and magazine articles. Meeting minutes include board of directors’ minutes, shareholders’ minutes, and Packard Sports Club minutes. A photocopied and typewritten copy of W.D. Packard’s diary is also included. The business proposals include specifications of Packard transformers intended for purchase by the Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries;RG 844
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectFerranti-Packard Transformers--Historyen_US
dc.subjectElectric Machinery Industry--Canada--Historyen_US
dc.subjectElectronic Industries--Canada--Historyen_US
dc.titleNorman Ball Ferranti-Packard Research Collection, 1877-1993, n.d.en_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-06-15T14:33:09Z


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