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dc.contributor.authorCameron, Chantal
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-29T18:20:47Z
dc.date.available2022-03-29T18:20:47Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/15676
dc.descriptionCaptain Peter Ogilvie of the 13th U.S. Regiment Infantry was involved in the Battle of Queenston Heights. He helped capture the British battery but was later captured by the Canadians. After his release he wrote an account of the battle that appeared in newspapers. His account generated some displeasure among other American officers, especially John Wool, who felt that Ogilvie claimed credit for the capture of the heights. Ogilvie attempted to publicly rectify this misconception in the newspapers but resigned his commission in June 1813.en_US
dc.description.abstractFour letters addressed to Captain Peter Ogilvie. The letters range in date from 1813 to 1823 and mostly concern his conduct during the War of 1812. The first letter is written by Lieutenant William W. Carr and is dated February 25, 1813. Carr writes about the Battle of Queenston Heights and differing accounts of the battle, showing support for Capt. Ogilvie’s version of events. He writes that “allow me to observe that I went no farther with the prisoner taken at our Battle at Queenston. Lachine at which place I continued about for weeks during which time I was favoured with the American papers weekly in one of them I perused a statement of the Battle given by you this Sir was the most correct of any that I have seen. I was perfectly satisfied with the correctness of your statements by my ascending the hill with you, the Brave siege, and was by your side when you made the assault which was the first made to gain the heights entire. Soon after my arrival to Albany the 18th Dec. 1812, I saw a statement in public print sent to Capt. Wool (though by his request) to you by Randolf Smith…to the degrading to your character from what this originated is more than I can account for except envy. I was certainly but a small assistance for you during the whole engagement in taking the heights and I saw nothing correlating with that dastardly letter sent to Capt. Wool I shall therefore contradict a statement which has been so notorious merely to stain[?] the credit of Wool in my opinion, this sir I mean no more (for I have but five minutes to spare) than a private introductory letter to share I shall send you immediately on receiving an answer from you—that is if it may meet your approbation”. The second letter is written by Geo. Reab, 2nd Lieut. in the 13th Reg. Infantry and is dated February 27, 1814. The writer expresses support of Capt. Ogilvie’s actions at the Battle of Queenston Heights, noting that “I shall express my approbation of you conduct at the Battle of Queenston…I was with you from the earliest part of the engagement until the unfortunate end…and as far as my observation extended your conduct on that day was such as might excite envy amongst veterans and is an example for the young that will, if followed, lead them to honor and glory…” The third letter is written by Lt. Col. J.R. Mullany and is dated Sept. 7, 1814 “on the march for Fort Erie”. The writer recommends Capt. Ogilvie to lead a new corps of troops. He writes that “having understood that a Corps of state Troops would be soon organized…I am induced at the request of Capt. Ogilvie late of the 13th Infy. to solicit your Excellency’s attention to him in the selection of Officer for that Corps. I can in truth assert that he possesses every requirement to render him an honorable and useful acquisition in the service of his Country…” The last letter is written by R.M. Malcom and is dated November 12, 1823. The letter concerns Ogilvie’s reputation as an officer and the writer offers support for his conduct. He writes that “Having lately been informed that your reputation as an officer during the late war has been most unjustly assailed...I take pleasure in adding my testimony to the many you have and may still obtain of the high estimations in which you was held as an officer and gentleman in the reg’t. to which we were attached—Should it be in my power to be further useful to you, you may command me.”en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries;RG 727
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectBattle of Queenston Heightsen_US
dc.subjectCanada--History--War of 1812en_US
dc.subjectUnited States--History--War of 1812en_US
dc.titleLetters to Captain Peter Ogilvie, 1813-1823en_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-03-29T18:20:47Z


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