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dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Meghan
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-26T19:01:29Z
dc.date.available2021-10-26T19:01:29Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/15275
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Increasing numbers of post-secondary students report that their stress is so overwhelming it inhibits their academic achievement and impacts their health. On campus, traditional, clinical paradigms for managing mental health by treating individuals already experiencing breakdowns in their ability to cope are no longer keeping pace with need. Adding more accessible, non-clinical interventions that focus on prevention and build individual, collective, and institutional well-being have the potential to enhance students’ capacity for managing significant stressors. This study explores university students’ participation in a new online wellness intervention that uses theory-informed, evidence-based pledges to build coping, caring, and connecting practices. METHODS: Between September 2020 and June 2021, in response to promotional campaigns for the intervention, 966 unique visitors accessed the intervention (website) 2,124 times. 114 individuals completed the brief, researcher-designed online survey assessing demographic characteristics, academic standing, substance use behaviours, and which one of the nine pledges they selected; 89 met eligibility criteria of being Brock students and were included in the study. RESULTS: The final sample consisted of 86.5% female-identifying participants, with an average age of 21.5 years. 21.3% were first-year students. 48.3% reported an average grade between 65-79%; none reported an average grade less than 65%. Past-month alcohol and cannabis consumption was lower than what might be expected in typical post-secondary populations. 69.7% made a pledge that could help themselves cope with their stress (with most choosing to use positive affirmations or intentionally spend time in nature). 16.9% pledged to commit an action that showed others they cared. 13.5% made a pledge that could help make their institution a better place to be. All pledges were selected at least once. Pledge choice was not associated with demographic, academic or substance use characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: This small, preliminary study suggests this online pledge initiative should be further investigated with larger, more diverse samples as a promising avenue to build students’ capacity to cope with stress and form caring and supportive connections on campus. It offers ideas for feasible and low-cost structural changes institutions can make to support the wellbeing of all students.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectStudenten_US
dc.subjectPost-secondaryen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.subjectWellbeingen_US
dc.subjectPledgeen_US
dc.titleAn Exploration of Post-Secondary Students’ Use of an Online Pledge Program to Improve Wellbeingen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Applied Disability Studiesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Applied Health Sciencesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-26T19:01:30Z


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