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dc.contributor.authorResch, Chelsie
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-12T16:21:30Z
dc.date.available2021-10-12T16:21:30Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/15223
dc.description.abstractCurrent theoretical models attribute the rise in risk-taking during adolescence to heightened activity in reward processing brain regions when in the presence of social and non-social rewarding stimuli. However, non-rewarding, but very salient stimuli, have also been shown to increase activity in reward processing brain regions and could, in theory, also increase risk taking propensity in adolescents. To examine this, we had participants complete a risk-taking task under “standard” conditions as well as under one of three experimental conditions: virtual peer observer with positive social feedback (positive social), virtual peer observer with neutral social feedback (negative social), and with triple the potential rewards (non-social positive). The study’s sample consisted of 59 mainly young adult participants (Mage = 20.69, SD = 5.08), where 22 identified as men and 37 identified as women. A multi-level model revealed no overall effect of exposure to the experimental context on risk-taking. Greater skin conductance was, unexpectedly, associated with less risk-taking. When examining each context in separate models, exposure to the non-social showed associations with increased risk-taking, whereas the positive social context did not. Negative social contexts showed a pattern of means suggesting that exposure to such contexts may be associated with increased risk-taking, but our models may have been underpowered and were unable to detect this effect. These findings suggest that the salience of a context may be an important factor to consider when exploring what drives adolescent risk-taking.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectrisk-takingen_US
dc.subjectsocialen_US
dc.subjectpeersen_US
dc.subjectarousalen_US
dc.subjectskin conductanceen_US
dc.titleExamining the Role of Physiological Arousal in Laboratory Risk-Taking in Social and Non-Social Contextsen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen
dc.degree.nameM.A. Psychologyen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-12T16:21:30Z


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