Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWarren, Meghan
dc.contributor.authorLininger, Monica R.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Craig A.
dc.contributor.authorCopp, Adam J.
dc.contributor.authorChimera, Nicole J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-27T15:19:15Z
dc.date.available2021-09-27T15:19:15Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationJournal of strength and conditioning research, 2020-08, Vol.34 (8), p.2302-2311en_US
dc.identifier.issn064-8011
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/15178
dc.description.abstractTo determine the association between functional screening tests and lower-body, noncontact injuries in Division I women basketball, soccer, and volleyball student-athletes (SA). Sixty-eight injury-free women SA (age19.1 ± 1.1 years, height171.3 ± 8.7 cm, and mass68.4 ± 9.5 kg) were tested preseason with single hop (SH), triple hop (TH), and crossover hop (XH) for distance, and isometric hip strength (abduction, extension, and external rotation) in randomized order. The first lower-body (spine and lower extremity), noncontact injury requiring intervention by the athletic trainer was abstracted from the electronic medical record. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to determine cut-points for each hopping test from the absolute value of between-limb difference. Body mass–adjusted strength was categorized into tertiles. Logistic regression determined the odds of injury with each functional screening test using the hopping tests cut-points and strength categories, adjusting for previous injury. Fifty-two SA were injured during the sport season. The cut-point for SH was 4 cm (sensitivity = 0.77, specificity = 0.43, and AUC = 0.53), and for TH and XH was 12 cm (sensitivity = 0.75 and 0.67, specificity = 0.71 and 0.57, AUC = 0.59 and 0.41, respectively). A statistically significant association with TH and injuries (adjusted odds ratio = 6.50 [95% confidence interval1.69–25.04]) was found. No significant overall association was found with SH or XH, nor with the strength tests. Using a clinically relevant injury definition, the TH showed the strongest predictive ability for noncontact injuries. This hopping test may be a clinically useful tool to help identify increased risk of injury in women SA participating in high-risk sports.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_US
dc.subjectAthletesen_US
dc.subjectAthletic injuries- epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectLogistic modelsen_US
dc.subjectMass screening- modelsen_US
dc.subjectMass screening- statistics and numerical dataen_US
dc.subjectMedical screeningen_US
dc.subjectMovementen_US
dc.subjectOdds ratioen_US
dc.subjectProspective studiesen_US
dc.subjectROC curveen_US
dc.subjectSensitivity and specificityen_US
dc.subjectSports injuriesen_US
dc.subjectStudentsen_US
dc.subjectYoung adulten_US
dc.titleAssociation of Functional Screening Tests and Noncontact Injuries in Division I Women Student-Athletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JSC.0000000000003004
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-27T15:19:15Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
The association of functional ...
Size:
356.9Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record