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dc.contributor.authorGiancaterino, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-17T14:45:59Z
dc.date.available2021-02-17T14:45:59Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/15015
dc.description.abstractBackground: The relationship between mood disorder and hypertension is not well understood among Canadian older adults. No research has examined whether religiosity has any impact on this relationship in a Canadian older adult population. Objectives: To examine i) the association between mood disorder and hypertension among older Canadian older adults and ii) if religion had an impact on this association Methods: Baseline data from the CLSA of 44,920 males and females aged 45 years and older was collected. Mood disorder and hypertension were defined by self-reported clinical diagnosis. Religious affiliation was categorized into two groups: no religious affiliation or some religious affiliation. Among religiously affiliated participants, religious attendance was categorized into four groups; daily/weekly, monthly, yearly and never in the past 12 months. Among non-religiously affiliated participants, religious attendance was categorized into two groups; no attendance and any form of attendance in the past 12 months. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between mood disorder, religious affiliation, religious attendance and hypertension. Age-related trends were also examined to see if any of the associations differed among different age groups. Results: The odds of reporting hypertension increased with self-reported mood disorder and/or religious affiliation by 27% (OR, [95% CI]: 1.27, [1.16, 1.39]) and 13% (OR, [95% CI]: 1.13, [1.04, 1.23]), respectively. As attendance to religious services and events increased, the magnitude of association between religious affiliation and hypertension decreased (OR, [95% CI]: 1.20 [1.09, 1.33] to 1.02, [0.92, 1.13]). Among religiously affiliated, the decrease in magnitude was more apparent (OR, [95% CI]: 1.01 [0.91, 1.12] to 0.85, [0.77, 0.93]). Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an association between mood disorder and hypertension, with the presence of mood disorder increasing the odds of hypertension. Similarly, being religiously affiliated seems to share a similar relationship with hypertension. To note, it seems as though the magnitude of the association between religious affiliation and hypertension decreases with increased attendance. This study will help to grow the ever-growing body of religious related literature and will be crucial in understanding the multifaceted nuanced nature of religion. Key Words: mood disorder, hypertension, religion, affiliation, CLSAen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectHypertensionen_US
dc.subjectMood Disorderen_US
dc.subjectReligionen_US
dc.subjectCLSAen_US
dc.titleMood Disorder and Hypertension Among Canadian Older Adults with Different Religious Affiliations: A Cross-sectional Analysis of the Baseline Data from the CLSAen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Applied Health Sciencesen_US


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