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dc.contributor.authorWatkin, Gordon
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T20:43:26Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T20:43:26Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/14984
dc.description.abstractWater is vital in supporting all life on Earth, and without it, all living things would cease to exist. Despite this vitality, water resources are steadily polluted and mismanaged. The challenge of pre-eminence, however, is plastic pollution within global water resources. Plastic is exceptionally disruptive and harmful to all forms of life, killing aquatic animals and is a toxicant to the chemistry of drinking water utilized for human consumption. The review of literature sought to understand how waste ends up in Earth’s oceans and the role sport plays in contributing to and mitigating plastic waste and use. This research sought to illustrate the perspectives food and beverage managers (P=10) have toward the future of managing plastic waste at sporting events in their facilities. Discussions stemmed through semi-structured interviews, influenced by four central research questions, theoretically underpinned by Transition Management Theory (TMT), the Attitude-Behaviour-Gap (ABG), concepts of Environmental Sustainability (ES) and ecocentric approaches to management. The study primarily focused on perceptions of participants toward implementing plastic-free programming within their facilities, and additionally, the adoption and incorporation of biodegradable alternatives. Collectively, participants called for an increased cohesion between all levels of government and their corporate partners, and a federal standardization of recycling practices. Participants collectively did not align with Koskijoki’s (1993) perceptions of ecocentric consumerism, but demonstrated consistently an awareness and desire to reconcile plastic-related consequences.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sustainability, Plastic Mitigation, Water, Ecocentrismen_US
dc.titleManagement Perspectives: Implications of Plastics Free Sport Facilities’ Beverage Serviceen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Applied Health Sciencesen_US


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