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dc.contributor.authorGurr, Geoff M.
dc.contributor.authorSun, Botong
dc.contributor.authorXia, Xiaofeng
dc.contributor.authorVasseur, Lisette
dc.contributor.authorXue, Minqian
dc.contributor.authorYou, Minsheng
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-22T18:34:51Z
dc.date.available2020-04-22T18:34:51Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-23
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in microbiology, 2018, Vol.9, pp.25en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/14801
dc.description.abstractThe development of insecticide resistance in insect pests is a worldwide concern and elucidating the underlying mechanisms is critical for effective crop protection. Recent studies have indicated potential links between insect gut microbiota and insecticide resistance and these may apply to the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), a globally and economically important pest of cruciferous crops. We isolated Enterococcus sp. (Firmicutes), Enterobacter sp. (Proteobacteria), and Serratia sp. (Proteobacteria) from the guts of P. xylostella and analyzed the effects on, and underlying mechanisms of insecticide resistance. Enterococcus sp. enhanced resistance to the widely used insecticide, chlorpyrifos, in P. xylostella, while in contrast, Serratia sp. decreased resistance and Enterobacter sp. and all strains of heat-killed bacteria had no effect. Importantly, the direct degradation of chlorpyrifos in vitro was consistent among the three strains of bacteria. We found that Enterococcus sp., vitamin C, and acetylsalicylic acid enhanced insecticide resistance in P. xylostella and had similar effects on expression of P. xylostella antimicrobial peptides. Expression of cecropin was down-regulated by the two compounds, while gloverin was up-regulated. Bacteria that were not associated with insecticide resistance induced contrasting gene expression profiles to Enterococcus sp. and the compounds. Our studies confirmed that gut bacteria play an important role in P. xylostella insecticide resistance, but the main mechanism is not direct detoxification of insecticides by gut bacteria. We also suggest that the influence of gut bacteria on insecticide resistance may depend on effects on the immune system. Our work advances understanding of the evolution of insecticide resistance in this key pest and highlights directions for research into insecticide resistance in other insect pest species.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.subjectDiamondback mothen_US
dc.subjectMicrobial symbiontsen_US
dc.subjectImmunityen_US
dc.subjectPleiotropic effectsen_US
dc.subjectGut bacteriaen_US
dc.titleGut Microbiota Mediate Insecticide Resistance in the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella (L.)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2018.00025
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-18T01:39:40Z


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