• Letter to Jimmie from Mrs. A. McConnell, Shuswap, B.C. , 29 July

      McConnell, Mrs. A. (07-29)
      **Please note: This letter contains language that reflect the time period when it was created and the view of its creator. This can include offensive and negative language, references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today. The item(s) retain their original content to ensure that attitudes and viewpoints are not erased from the historical record. The Archives & Special Collections are actively working on including more respectful and representative language in our own descriptions now and into the future.** --------------------------------------------------Letter to Jimmie from Mrs. A. McConnell, Shuswap, B.C. She was sorry to hear that his barn burned down, and hopes he did not lose any horses or cows. She mentions incidents of an "Indian" shooting his wife, and an "Indian" being hanged for shooting a white man. It is noted that they are a very quiet lot who live across the river and never do any harm to anybody. She mentions their place in the mountains. She will send pictures of her husband and a friend, Mr. Phillips, and her sister and herself, July 29.
    • Land grant to Matthew Forest, 1790

      1790
      Land grant to Matthew Forest. Only a small portion of the land grant remains. The name John Graves Simcoe appears near the bottom. A partial date is on the reverse side, 1790.
    • Account of Messrs. Geo. and Alex. Hamilton from William Robertson, April 1809- May 1810

      Robertson, William (1810-05)
      Account (2 p. handwritten) of Messrs. Geo. and Alex. Hamilton from William Robertson. The invoice is for assorted items including whisky, tobacco, shoes, candles, and beef, November 1, 1810. The account covers the period from April 1809 to May 1810.
    • Bill of Lading for Messrs. George and Alexander Hamilton of Queenston

      Richard Cartwright & Co. (1810-07-25)
      Bill of Lading for 125 articles shipped on board the schooner Governor Simcoe for Messrs. George and Alexander Hamilton of Queenston. The bill is dated at Kingston, Richard Cartwright & Co., July 25, 1810, rec’d. August 1.
    • Land grant to Nicholas Bower, Township of Camden, County of Lenox and Addington, Midland District, 20 May 1811

      Jarvis, William; Selby, P.; Firth, William; Gore, Sir Francis (1811-05-20)
      Land grant to Nicholas Bower, Township of Camden, County of Lenox and Addington, Midland District, son of Adam Bower, U.E. Loyalist. The land grant is for 200 acres of land in the Township of Reach, May 20, 1811. Signed by William Jarvis (Provincial Secretary to the Lt. Governor of Upper Canada); P. Selby (Auditor General); William Firth (Attorney General); and Sir Francis Gore (Lt. Governor of Upper Canada).
    • Letter to Messrs. George and Alex. Hamilton, Merchants of Queenston, from John McGill, York, 4 January 1812

      McGill, John (1812-01-04)
      Letter to Messrs. George and Alex. Hamilton, Merchants of Queenston, from John McGill, York. The letter states that McGill will accept the four hundred bushels of peas, as well as any further quantity, for the use of the Government at the rate of five shillings per bushel. They are to be delivered into the Kings stores at Queenston or Fort George by May 1. He asks to receive a reply to this offer, January 4, 1812.
    • Letter to Wm. H. Merritt, Niagara Lt. Dragoons, Deleware, from Alex. Hamilton, July 1812

      Hamilton, Alexander (1812-07)
      Letter to Wm. H. Merritt, Niagara Lt. Dragoons, Deleware, from Alex. Hamilton. The letter offers for the use of Government 70 lbs. of pork and 370 bushels of pears, and requests an answer as soon as convenient. A copy of the letter was also sent to Edward Couch, Commissary General, Fort George, July 1812.
    • Letter to Capt. Alex. Hamilton from George Hamilton, 15 July 1812

      Hamilton, George (1812-07-15)
      Letter to Capt. Alex. Hamilton, Niagara, from George Hamilton, Chippewa. The letter concerns some business with Mr. Summers, formerly belonging to the 2nd Troop which merits [?] misrepresentations and has been “to the devil”. He writes that to you and others he states that he is very sorry [?] that it has taken place and pretends not to have had any hand in it. However, he writes that he has from General Brock himself that he first proposed only allowing the 1st Troop to continue and begging the charging [?] powder, preferring the Genl. information to his being from the highest authority?. He says that some state that they joined the 2nd, and not the 1st Troop. He writes that he has nothing to do with it but it would be unfair to press them to join against their will. He adds that Summers is a very decent lad and deserves to be appointed as sergeant [?], which he intended to do as soon as the 2nd Troop had been filled up. He writes that there is nothing more that he wants at present than to be aboard the Royal George and Prince Regent. He states that he will go as a volunteer when things become serious. Some passages are very difficult to read. He appears to be writing about raising men, and feels that an injustice has been done to him and he should have had the command of one of the Comp. He writes that they now wish him to take command with all the best men taken out. He adds that he is on his way with McCormick to Fort Erie and will return in a day or two to Queenston. July 15, 1812.
    • Letter to Captain Alex. Hamilton. N. Lt. Dragoons from Charles Askin, 21 July 1812

      Askin, Charles (1812-07-21)
      **Please note: This letter contains language that reflect the time period when it was created and the view of its creator. This can include offensive and negative language, references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today. The item(s) retain their original content to ensure that attitudes and viewpoints are not erased from the historical record. The Archives & Special Collections are actively working on including more respectful and representative language in our own descriptions now and into the future.**------------------------------------------- Letter to Captain Alex. Hamilton. N. Lt. Dragoons, Niagara, from Charles Askin, Oxford. He writes that he has arrived here with most of his party, which he is sorry to say is very small, and there is little probability of it being much stronger. He adds that the "Indians" have not joined us yet and seem very unwilling to do so. He notes that one hundred and fifty were to go with us, and that Norton will hardly be able to bring fifty. He writes that the Regimental coats of the 41st Regiment are worn by many militia and they appear to be very proud of them. On their way they have mustered a few volunteers, including Thomas Racey, Col. Bostwick, and one of John D[?]’s brothers. He understands that Mr. Pallinson [?] & Mr. Baby had passed Long Pt. yesterday on their way to York to attend the Parliament and was told there has been two or three skirmishes at Amherstburgh. He adds that Division two of the 41st Regiment were attacked by 40 of the enemy and refused to surrender. They made a charge at them, but the cowardly yankees fired a volley at them and wounded them both. One was taken prisoner and died soon after, the other supposedly died as well. He writes that he was extremely happy to find that the militia at Sandwich did not behave in the shameful manner it was said they had. He states that he has seen a man who was present when they marched down from Sandwich to Amherstburg, who said that Col., Ft. George [?] was up there and gave three cheers on their arrival, and then ordered them to march. He writes that he still has hopes that the militia there will behave as well as that in any other part of the Province. He adds that Alex is Lieut. of a troop of horse commanded by Capt. Jacobs. He has not heard how James is employed. He adds that he is not at all pleased with this letter and asks that it be destroyed, July 21, 1812.
    • Letter to Alexander from George Hamilton, August 1812

      Hamilton, George (1812-08)
      **Please note: This letter contains language that reflect the time period when it was created and the view of its creator. This can include offensive and negative language, references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today. The item(s) retain their original content to ensure that attitudes and viewpoints are not erased from the historical record. The Archives & Special Collections are actively working on including more respectful and representative language in our own descriptions now and into the future.**--------------------------------------------- Letter (4 pages) to Alexander from George Hamilton. The writer apologizes for not writing sooner, and adds that Charles has likely given an account of their expedition. The Long Point Militia is mentioned, and it is stated that it will be some time before they will have a sufficient reinforcement. The Oxford militia is also mentioned. He writes that he has heard from some "Indians" that Governor Hull has about 1500 men and that they mentioned 4000 to you. He adds that little dependence can be placed on their intelligence but the former account agrees better with other information, with some being on this side at Sandwich and the remainder at Detroit. He writes that how or when they proceed he does not know, but thinks that going down the river in a large boat is the correct and most predictable plan. He is afraid that the coming reinforcements will be too small. It is reported that a few men have been placed at certain distances on the river with the intention gaining intelligence, and a few of the enemy are said to be at the mouth of the river, and the rest to Sandwich. He writes that he does not know when this may reach you, and that Mr. Woodruff has an order on him for forty pounds. He asks that his sister be assured that he is quite well and in good spirits, and out of danger. He says that it would give Charles and himself much pleasure to see him at the head of your Troop, but is afraid that will not take place, and so hopes to have the pleasure of seeing him soon, August 1812. No postmark.
    • Letter to Capt. Alex. Hamilton, N. Lt. Dragoons, Niagara from Ch. Askin, Strabane, 5 August 1812

      Askin, Charles (1812-08-05)
      **Please note: This letter contains language that reflect the time period when it was created and the view of its creator. This can include offensive and negative language, references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today. The item(s) retain their original content to ensure that attitudes and viewpoints are not erased from the historical record. The Archives & Special Collections are actively working on including more respectful and representative language in our own descriptions now and into the future.**------------------------------------------- [The following letter was dated August 5, 1812. Given the content of the letter, it is more likely that this letter was written on September 5.]
    • Letter to Captain Alex. Hamilton from Charles Askin, 25 August 1812

      Askin, Charles (1812-08-25)
      **Please note: This letter contains language that reflect the time period when it was created and the view of its creator. This can include offensive and negative language, references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today. The item(s) retain their original content to ensure that attitudes and viewpoints are not erased from the historical record. The Archives & Special Collections are actively working on including more respectful and representative language in our own descriptions now and into the future.**--------------------------------------------- Letter (7 pages) to Captain Alex. Hamilton, N. Lt. Dragoons, Niagara, from Charles Askin, Strabane. He writes that since George has left he has not had an opportunity to write, so any items of consequence that occurred in this quarter he has probably already heard from George. He regrets not having left with him as he has witnessed some shocking scenes. He states that Major Chambers was sent to River Raisin and Fort Miami to take possession of some block houses and destroy them, and to bring anything belonging to the United States, such as arms and provisions, to Amherstburgh. He writes that the commander at River Raisin refused to surrender. He notes that the "Indians" could not be got ready for a day or two, but at last they got off from Amherstburgh. When they arrived at the River Raisin, all the inhabitants had surrendered, agreeable to the capitulation of Detroit. He adds that the inhabitants were plundered by the "Indians", and that they were looking to them for protection as had been promised by our Government, but it was not in their power to provide it. He notes that hardly a horse was left in the settlement and the violence was great. They remained one day at River Raisin and then went to Fort Miami, where the "Indians" plundered, but not so greatly as at River Raisin. He adds that they have been forced to lock their horses in the stables at night and watch them well in the day time. He states that Colonel Procter is made Governor of the Michigan Territory and Judge Woodward is his Secretary, and that the Governor is too stiff to be very popular. Robert Dickson is expected here every day. He notes that there has been so much public property taken at Detroit that it is supposed there will be a great deal of prize money, August 25, 1812. A note next to the address states the letter was forwarded by Major Chambers.
    • Letter to Capt. Alex. Hamilton of Queenston from Charles Askin, Strabane, 30 August 1812

      Askin, Charles (1812-08-30)
      **Please note: This letter contains language that reflect the time period when it was created and the view of its creator. This can include offensive and negative language, references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today. The item(s) retain their original content to ensure that attitudes and viewpoints are not erased from the historical record. The Archives & Special Collections are actively working on including more respectful and representative language in our own descriptions now and into the future.**---------------------------------------------- Letter to Capt. Alex. Hamilton of Queenston from Charles Askin, Strabane. He writes that nothing of much consequence has happened in this quarter since he last wrote. Some rebels have returned from Cleveland where they had been to take some American prisoners. The Thames was taken on her passage back but no one on board perished. He notes that there are still about 600 prisoners at Detroit and Amherstburgh, and that there are 3000 troops at Cleveland. He states that the dead the Yankees have of the "Indians" is incredible. He writes that there was an auction yesterday at Detroit, where a number of the articles taken at the surrender of the place were sold. He purchased two wagons here. He heard an officer say yesterday that the Captain’s share of the prize money would be £800. He writes that he hopes it may be 80, for it will help many of his friends in this quarter very much, but it seems so large a sum he can hardly credit it. He states that he saw Lord Selkirk’s sheep this morning, who had come down while the Americans were on this side of the River. Governor Hull had taken part of them and divided the others among his friends. Most of them are collected and are now at Detroit. He asks if any newspapers he gets can be sent to him for his mother and father, as they are anxious to know what is going on and they are now unable to get newspapers there. He also asks that Hamilton inquire about the things he sent to his father in the spring and fall, as they never arrived. Mr. Bush intended leaving Detroit and going to the States, but is now laid up with the Gout, August 30, 1812.
    • Letter to Captain Hamilton from Geo. Hamilton, November 1812

      Hamilton, Geo. (1812-11)
      Letter to Captain Hamilton, Niagara, from Geo. Hamilton, Canborough. The writer states that he has just learned that “your infernal dragoons” at Canborough are in his stables there, without “leave or licence”. He has learned that W.H. Merritt has been up in that quarter and presumes that they have been directed by him. He asks that these youths be recalled instantly and fined to pay for the damage they have done, in order to avoid a formal complaint against them to General Sheaffe. An added note states that James is new with Robert and is likely to receive a commission in Roberts Company as 2nd Lieut. As he is not allowed to go any distance from his post, he asks that the writer persuade James to ride to Canborough to get the rafts down. He was not able to do this as James is in Company with Mr. Clark. He urges the writer to write to James. He adds that Robert mentioned that he wanted to speak to James about appointing him executor, November 1812.
    • Letter to Alexander Hamiltom from Robert Gillespie, 1 January 1815

      Gillespie, Robert (1815-01-01)
      Letter to Alexander Hamilton of Queenston, Burlington Heights, from Robert Gillespie, Montreal. The letter contains an account summary of George and Alex. Hamilton’s account with Gillespie. He notes that £172.18.3 is owing. A detailed account is included on a separate page. He adds that he may at a future date ask for an account statement from Hamilton, January 1, 1815.
    • Letter to Robt. Hamilton from Thos. Gourlay, 19 January 1818

      Gourlay, Thos. (1818-01-19)
      Letter to Robt. Hamilton, Queenston, Upper Canada, from Thos. Gourlay, New York. It is stated that he has written several letters to Queenston but has not received a reply. He asked Robt. Corbet to forward to the New York Post Office any letters that arrived for him after he left Canada, and to notify him of his brothers motions, but he has not done so. He asks that Hamilton inform him on the subject. He has heard the [preacher?] of Niagara has been thrown into goal and that Robert followed. He does not know the cause of their being apprehended or what will become of them. It is likely he will take a passage to one of the Islands and there wait for a vessel going to South America. He presently boards at 15 Front St., but asks that any mail be directed to the Post Office should he move. Cooper [name missing] boards in the same house and is a Canadian, and is acquainted with most of the good folks in that quarter. He asks if Hamilton knows him, January 19, 1818. Postmarked New York Jan 19.
    • Letter to Mess. Smith and Hamilton of Queenston from McTavish and Galloway

      McTavish; Galloway (1819-01-19)
      **Please note: This letter contains language that reflect the time period when it was created and the view of its creator. This can include offensive and negative language, references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today. The item(s) retain their original content to ensure that attitudes and viewpoints are not erased from the historical record. The Archives & Special Collections are actively working on including more respectful and representative language in our own descriptions now and into the future.**------------------------------------------- Letter to Mess. Smith and Hamilton of Queenston from McTavish and Galloway, Montreal. The letter asks that Smith and Hamilton to provide them with the particulars of the postage acct., such as the weight and measurement of each package, so that they can judge the accuracy of the charges. A lengthy reply to a previous letter is also addressed, concerning accounts. It is stated that they do not open any accounts of a mercantile nature with any persons on the communication, as they confine themselves solely to the "Indian" trade. Not being aware of this, Mr. McGillivray promised an advance to Mr. Smith. This exception will be honoured, however, since they must pay for goods purchased immediately, and without commission, they state that in the future they will be unable to assist in this way again. He also states that their transport business for the coming season will not be greater than the last, January 16, 1819. Straight line postmark, Montreal JAN 19.
    • Letter to Alexander Hamilton, Queenston, from John Hamilton, Montreal, 10 April 1820

      Hamilton, John (1820-04-10)
      Letter to Alexander Hamilton, Queenston, from John Hamilton, Montreal. The letter concerns personal matters and family news, with mention of Joseph and Peter Hamilton, Mr. Barnet, and Mr. Blackwood, April 10, 1820. Three pages. There is some cross-writing on the last page.
    • Letter - Alexander Hamilton of Queenston from D. Sutherland of Quebec, 2 May 1822

      Sutherland, Daniel (1822-05-02)
      Letter to Alexander Hamilton of Queenston from D. Sutherland of Quebec. The letter addresses Hamilton’s concerns about the new tariff of distances and rates of Postage, and how they were calculated. Sutherland acknowledges that there are several errors, but that the distances were taken from the Surveyor General’s Office in Upper Canada, and the rates of postage are determined by an Act of the British Parliament, May 2, 1822. Postmarked Quebec MY 4 22.
    • Letter to Alex. Hamilton from John Strachan, 19 May 1823

      Strachan, John (1823-05-19)
      Letter to Alex. Hamilton from John Strachan, York. The letter concerns the estate of Hamilton’s late father. He writes that there have been delays arising partly from the difficulty of arranging the accounts of the estate, and partly from the public avocations of the gentlemen appointed to adjust them. He says they will be ready for a final settlement in the beginning of next month, and he will come to Niagara on Monday and meet with him and his brothers the next day. He asks for his remarks and opinions not only on his own accounts, but also on the general settlement and amicable division of the estate, May 19, 1823.