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dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Jane
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-25T20:38:07Z
dc.date.available2020-02-25T20:38:07Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/14738
dc.description.abstractThe present study examines the influencing effect of executive functions, specifically inhibition and working memory, on the relationship between decoding and reading comprehension. The current research suggests that the decoding-comprehension relationship is likely more complex than past theoretical models have postulated. Recently, the idea that non-linguistic cognitive skills may be responsible for this relationship has gained traction. As a part of the NHLP, a longitudinal cohort study conducted in New Haven, Connecticut, 256 students were asked to complete reading and executive function measures, as the children progressed through grade 1 and 2. These measures included tasks independently designed to assess decoding, working memory, inhibition and vocabulary, as well as two separate measures of reading comprehension. Results showed that inhibition acted as a significant mediator in both the decoding-comprehension and vocabulary-comprehension relationships. The results also showed that working memory acted as a significant moderator of the direct effect in the decoding-comprehension relationship, but did not moderate the vocabulary-comprehension relationship. These findings support the idea that decoding and language alone are not solely responsible for reading comprehension performance, and that other non-linguistic factors must be taken into consideration. Better understanding the decoding-comprehension relationship has important implications for teaching practice, and early identification and intervention required for exceptional learners.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectreadingen_US
dc.subjectdecodingen_US
dc.subjectinhibitionen_US
dc.subjectworking memoryen_US
dc.subjectreading comprehensionen_US
dc.titleA Less Simple View of Reading: The Role of Inhibition and Working Memory in the Decoding-Comprehension Relationshipen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Child and Youth Studiesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Child and Youth Studiesen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US


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