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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Brittany
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-18T15:18:54Z
dc.date.available2019-10-18T15:18:54Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/14545
dc.description.abstractAnimal cruelty investigation work in Canada has typically been the responsibility of humane societies and/or SPCAs (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), charities that are mandated to enforce government legislation. This unusual model is unique to investigations into crimes against animals. Manitoba offers an alternative approach with a publicly-funded and public-private hybrid delivery model. Through an examination of Manitoba’s Chief Veterinary Office which oversees investigations, this thesis considers the multi-species implications of this kind of publicly-funded animal cruelty investigations. More specifically, it assesses the benefits and drawbacks that the approach has for animals, their owners, and animal protection officers. Using the lenses of engaged theory, interspecies solidarity, and multi-optic vision, and by building from textual sources and interview data, this thesis describes and analyses animal cruelty investigation work in Manitoba and considers the role the public sector could have in improving animal protection work in Canada.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjecthumane jobsen_US
dc.subjectpublic sectoren_US
dc.subjectanimal protectionen_US
dc.subjectmulti-species well-beingen_US
dc.subjectworkers’ rightsen_US
dc.titleProtecting Animals and People: The Role of the Public Sector in Improving Animal Cruelty Investigation Worken_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Social Justice and Equity Studiesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Justice and Equity Studies Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US


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