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dc.contributor.authorZabin, Rakha
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-21T19:00:30Z
dc.date.available2019-08-21T19:00:30Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/14468
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the role of emotional intelligence (EI) among international students adjusting to life in different universities in Ontario and the institutional support provided to them to develop their EI. The study included an in-depth review of literature based on different frameworks of cultural adjustments and EI, as well as a comprehensive analysis of the policy documents (e.g., policy management guide or handbook) available online of 3 similar-sized, student-focused, research-based universities in Ontario with significant international programs. The study also includes an auto-ethnographic account of the experiences I dealt with during my university years. I reflected on the hurdles and challenges I experienced in making my social and emotional adjustments here in Ontario. Overall, the data from the conceptual analysis and auto-ethnography afforded a cross-comparison of the 3 university policies and helped me establish a set of recommendations for universities to incorporate multiple components of EI into their international university policies services to develop components like mindfulness, self-regulation, and stress management for the future international graduate students.en_US
dc.subjectEmotional Intelligenceen_US
dc.subjectInternationalizationen_US
dc.subjectGraduate Studentsen_US
dc.subjectInstitutional Policyen_US
dc.subjectRecommendationen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Emotional Intelligence in Ontario University Educational Policies for International Graduate Students: A Conceptual, Institutional and Auto-Ethnographic Analysisen_US


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