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dc.contributor.authorGasparotto, Jennifer.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-21T14:02:36Z
dc.date.available2009-05-21T14:02:36Z
dc.date.issued2007-05-21T14:02:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/1420
dc.description.abstractWith incidence rates of osteoporosis increasing (Osteoporosis Canada, 2007), preventative efforts to minimize costs associated with condition diagnosis are a public health priority. Cues to action are specific internal (e.g., physical symptoms, family member with a condition) or external stimuli (e.g., public service announcements, health education campaigns) that are necessary to trigger appropriate health behaviours and serve to create an awareness of the health threat (Mattson, 1999). To date, limited understanding of the scope of influence cues to action have on health beliefs and behaviour associated with osteoporosis is known. The present investigation was designed to address this gap in the literature. More specifically, the influence of cues to action, a public service announcement (PSA) developed by Osteoporosis Canada and a bone screening by way of Quantitative Ultrasound, on health beliefs and health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) across a four week period was investigated. Peri-and postmenopausal women (N= 174) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions 1) an osteoporosis public service announcement (PSA) condition; 2) a bone screening condition via quantitative ultrasound techniques, and 3) a PSA attention control condition. Health beliefs associated with osteoporosis were taken at three time points: prior to the cue to action intervention, immediately following the intervention, and four weeks post intervention. Knowledge of osteorporosis risk factors and HEP A were assessed pre and post-intervention only. Results of a regression analysis suggested that baseline health beliefs predicted baseline HEPA (R2 adj = .24; F (9, 161) = 6.49,p = .000; 95% CI = .12 - .35) with exercise barriers (p = -.33) being a negative predictor and health motivation (p = .21) being a positive predictor of HEP A. Baseline health beliefs predicted With incidence rates of osteoporosis increasing (Osteoporosis Canada, 2007), preventative efforts to minimize costs associated with condition diagnosis are a public health priority. Cues to action are specific internal (e.g., physical symptoms, family member with a condition) or external stimuli (e.g., public service announcements, health education campaigns) that are necessary to trigger appropriate health behaviours and serve to create an awareness of the health threat (Mattson, 1999). To date, limited understanding of the scope of influence cues to action have on health beliefs and behaviour associated with osteoporosis is known. The present investigation was designed to address this gap in the literature. More specifically, the influence of cues to action, a public service announcement (PSA) developed by Osteoporosis Canada and a bone screening by way of Quantitative Ultrasound, on health beliefs and health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) across a four week period was investigated. Peri-and postmenopausal women (N= 174) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions 1) an osteoporosis public service announcement (PSA) condition; 2) a bone screening condition via quantitative ultrasound techniques, and 3) a PSA attention control condition. Health beliefs associated with osteoporosis were taken at three time points: prior to the cue to action intervention, immediately following the intervention, and four weeks post intervention. Knowledge of osteorporosis risk factors and HEP A were assessed pre and post-intervention only. Results of a regression analysis suggested that baseline health beliefs predicted baseline HEPA (R2 adj = .24; F (9, 161) = 6.49,p = .000; 95% CI = .12 - .35) with exercise barriers (p = -.33) being a negative predictor and health motivation (p = .21) being a positive predictor of HEP A. Baseline health beliefs predicteden_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectOsteoporosis in womenen_US
dc.subjectHealth behavior.en_US
dc.titleCues to action : do they result in belief and behavioural change in women?en_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-16T10:48:32Z


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