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dc.contributor.authorWatson, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-11T13:59:00Z
dc.date.available2019-03-11T13:59:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/14011
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis was to investigate whether threat-related changes in attention focus and postural control could be modified using distraction. Healthy young adults (N=21) stood without (No Threat) and with (Threat) the possibility of receiving an unpredictable anterior or posterior support surface translation under conditions in which they were required to perform or not perform a distractor task. The results of the thesis showed significant threat-related changes in attention focus and postural control independent of distraction. When performing with distraction compared to without, threat-related changes in high-frequency sway (1.0-2.5 Hz) were significantly reduced, and threat-related changes in attention focus to self-regulatory strategies tended to be reduced. These findings suggest that distraction may modify threat-related changes in attention focus and postural control.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectpostural controlen_US
dc.subjectthreaten_US
dc.subjectemotionen_US
dc.subjectattention focusen_US
dc.subjectdistractionen_US
dc.titleThe effects of distraction on threat-related changes in attention focus and postural controlen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Applied Health Sciencesen_US


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