Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCyopeck, Thomas Neil.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-21T13:46:05Z
dc.date.available2009-05-21T13:46:05Z
dc.date.issued2002-05-21T13:46:05Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/1330
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this thesis is to study the involvement of the Auditor General in the proposal, implementation and review of major public service reform initiatives during a period spanning nearly forty years, from the early 1960s to 2001 . This period began with the Glassco Commission and concludes at the end of the term in office of Auditor General Denis Desautels in 2001. It has been demonstrated throughout this work that the role of the OAG has varied, from proponent to critic, from instigator to reviewer. In the past forty years the OAG's mandate has changed to meet the requirements of critical analysis of government operations and this has been aptly demonstrated in the office's relationship to the issue of public service reform. It has been argued that many of the problems facing the public service are cultural in nature. Reform initiatives have taken on a number of various forms with each addressing a different set of priorities. However, there has been a great deal of consistency in the cultural values that these initiatives articulate. Throughout this thesis attention has been paid to values. Values define a culture and cultural change is required within the Canadian federal public service. How and when this cultural change will occur is but one question to be answered. During the period under consideration in this thesis the government undertook several significant public service reform initiatives. Those examined in this thesis include: The Royal Commission on Government Organization, The Special Committee on the Review of Personnel Management and the Merit Principle, The Royal Commission on Financial Management and Accountability, Increased Ministerial Authority and Accountability, Public Service 2000, Program Review and finally La Releve. The involvement, or interest, of the Auditor General's Office on the subject of public service reform is generally articulated through the means of its annual reports to Parliament although there have been supplementary undertakings on this issue. Such material relevant to this study include: Towards Better Governance: Public Service Reform in New Zealand (1984-94) and its Relevance to Canada and Reform in the Australian Public Service. Annual reports to Parliament include: "Values, Service and Performance," (1990), "Canada's Public Service Reform and Lessons Learned from Selected Jurisdictions," (1993), "Maintaining a Competent and Efficient Public Service," (1997), and "Expenditure and Work Force Reduction in Selected Departments,"en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectCivil service reformen_US
dc.subjectPublic administrationen_US
dc.subjectLegislative auditingen_US
dc.titlePublic service reform and the role of the Auditor General /en_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen
dc.degree.nameM.A. Political Scienceen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Political Scienceen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-30T02:43:12Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Brock_Cyopeck_Thomas_2002.pdf
Size:
11.02Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record