• Water-Power in the East

      Laut, Agnes C. (1909)
      The article discusses "The Real Meaning of Conservation", "The Situation in New York", "Too Much Water and Too Little". The author mentions that "Conservation of water-power as it exists in actual practise does not mean the locking up of water-power against the public. It means the throwing open of that power to full development - dry season as well as rainy, not just a tenth of the possible power, but ten-tenths of the possible power; not just to the profit of one per cent of the population or two or three units of capital, but to the profit of every living soul in the State where that water-power exists. Conservation is not demanding that water-power be conserved in the West for the East, but that water-power be conserved in the West for the West, and in the East for the East."
    • Who Owns the Earth and How Did They Get it?

      Hyde, Henry M. (1909-02)
      The author mentions the issues associated with using hydroelectric power in Niagara Falls and discusses the issues that may arise based on past experiences, "To the myopic and indifferent public the idea of a few men getting control of the water supply and of drawing vast wealth from that control will sound like the foolish wail of a crack-brained sensationalist; it will arouse only a fatuous smile of ignorant contempt. But the readers of this magazine have heard of the turbine water-wheel; they know what is meant by the long distance transmission of electric power; they are able to realize what it means to hand over forever, as a free gift to a little coterie of men, the absolute control of the incalculable power developed by the rivers and streams of the United States. And - pray God- once they do understand the situation, they will not smile, but smite. The Congress of the United States and the legislatures of the various states are the danger points which must be constantly watched if the people are to be saved from spoliation."