• Diary of Anne Powell on her voyage from Montreal to Detroit with her brother W.D. [William Dummer ] Powell (later Chief Justice of Upper Canada)

      Powell, Anne (1789)
      Diary of Anne Powell on her voyage from Montreal to Detroit with her brother W.D. [William Dummer ] Powell (later Chief Justice of Upper Canada), 1789. The handwritten journal is 20 pp. in length, plus a separate leaf with a red seal watermarked 1832. It was written on her return to Montreal. During the trip she observed a Six Nations Council, describing the dress and manners of the tribal people. She wrote a lengthy description of her impressions of Mohawk Chief David Hill (Karonghyontye) and, to a lesser extent, Seneca Chief Red Jacket (Sagoyewatha). She also mentions encounters with Peter Hunter (later Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada); Lord Edward Fitzgerald; and Mohawk Joseph Brant. Thomas Smith (later clerk of the Court of the District of Hesse, a member of the Michigan Militia, killed at the Battle of Fallen Timbers) is also mentioned. The journal has been published in The Magazine of American History (July 1880): 37-47; and William Renwick Riddell’s Old Province Tales: Upper Canada (1920), pp. 64-95. Anne Powell married merchant and fellow Loyalist, Isaac Winslow Clarke (mentioned in the journal). She died in childbirth in Montreal in 1792.
    • A letter written and signed by Samuel Peters Jarvis, Ch. S. I. Affa. [Chief Superintendent of Indian Affairs] addressed to the Chiefs of the Six Nations of the Grand River

      Jarvis, Samuel Peters (1841-01-05)
      A letter written and signed by Samuel Peters Jarvis, Ch. S. I. Affa. [Chief Superintendent of Indian Affairs], addressed to the Chiefs of the Six Nations of the Grand River, dated 5 January 1841. The letter is 3 pages in length and informs the Chiefs that the Lieutenant Governor has considered their speech, especially the problem of unauthorized occupancy of their land by white people, and has determined that each family or single man receive 100 or 200 acres, with the remainder of the land be “surrendered to Government to be disposed of for the exclusive benefit of the Indians”. A note on the letter indicates “the reply after being corrected by Sir Charles Metcalf”.
    • Public Notice, 28 March 1844

      1844-03-28
      Public Notice, 28 March 1844. “The inspection and valuation of certain Lands on the North side of the Grand River, in the Gore and Niagara Districts, belonging to the Six Nations Indians, being now completed, in pursuance of an order in Council, dated 27th, November, 1840: the Public are hereby notified that the said Lands, with certain exceptions, are for Sale, under the following regulations, viz…” Followed by 10 paragraphs of text. The last few lines read “By Command of His Excellency the Governor General, Samuel P Jarvis, Chief Sup. Indian Affairs, Indian Office, Kingston, March 28, 1844”.