Brock University Digital Repository 


Brock University’s Digital Repository is an online archive showcasing and preserving the Brock community’s scholarly output as well as items from the Library’s Special Collections and Archives. Researchers can disseminate their work by depositing it in this Open Access repository, which provides free, immediate access to users while also allowing Brock scholars to track downloads and views of their scholarship.

For more information, see the repository's policies and procedures.

Share Your Work - Not sure where to start? Have Library Staff deposit your work on your behalf. Just fill in this form and we'll proceed on your behalf.

Self Submission - Deposit your paper or research material directly into the repository. Simply login with your Portal Information at this link and follow along.

Thesis Submission - If you need to submit your thesis to the repository to complete your graduation requirements you can do so here. Login with your Portal Information and fill in the form.

Researcher Profiles

 

 

  • The temporal relationship between cardiolipin biosynthesis and remodeling enzymes and cardiolipin content during unloading atrophy in mouse soleus

    Elkes, Mario; Applied Health Sciences Program
    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue that consists of individual fibers that differ in contractile and metabolic properties. Skeletal muscle is also dynamic in its ability to adapt to external stimuli through changes in cell size, number, and/or fiber type composition, which are matched by mitochondrial content. Mitochondria are central to skeletal muscle adaptations and mitochondrial energetic function is highly dependent on the membrane phospholipid composition, specifically the mitochondrially exclusive cardiolipin (CL). CL biosynthesis results in nascent CL which must be remodeled by tafazzin (Taz) to form the predominant CL species in mammals, tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin (TLCL). Previous research has shown that CL content and 18:2n6 composition decreased and Taz protein content increased in tenotomy-induced atrophied mouse soleus, suggesting the upregulation of Taz may play a role in slowing this process. Thus, the purpose of this thesis was to examine the temporal relationship between enzymes of CL biosynthesis and remodelling and CL content during unload induced atrophy. Fourteen days post tenotomy resulted in reduced expression of phosphatidyl glycerol phosphate synthase (PGS1) and Taz protein, as well as a reduction in CL content. PGS1 appeared to be reduced prior to changes to CL content, while Taz was reduced following changes to CL content, suggesting that CL content is mainly dependant on PGS1, and the reduction in total CL may have reduced the need for Taz. This is the first study to show a temporal relationship between CL, CL biosynthesis and remodeling enzymes during muscle atrophy. Our identification of the CL biosynthesis proteins which are impacted during muscle atrophy resulting in reduced CL content, may pave the path for future treatment strategies to preserve the function of these enzymes during atrophy, and maintain CL content.
  • “I’ll be more prepared than most people”: Very young Canadian workers talking about their first jobs

    Raby, Rebecca; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Easterbrook, Riley; Helleiner, Jane (Sage Publications, 2018)
    We report on interviews with very young Canadian workers regarding their first jobs, with a focus on why they started working, the rewards and risks of their work, and their familial supports. Our participants were largely positive about their early work experiences, although they also raised concerns, e.g. about safety. We reflect on three inter-related themes emerging from their accounts: competence and vulnerability, independence and dependence, and protection and under-protection.
  • Haynes Avenue Presbyterian Church fonds, 1876-1996

    Cameron, Chantal (2022-06-15)
    Fonds consists of minute books, financial records, a marriage register, and a newspaper.
  • The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on early career researcher activity, development, career, and well-being: the state of the art

    Lokhtina, Irina A.; Castelló, Montserrat; Lambrechts, Agata Agnieszka; Löfström, Erika; McGinn, Michelle K.; Skakni, Isabelle; van der Weijden, Inge (Emerald, 2022-06-01)
    DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH. This is a systematic literature review of English-language peer-reviewed studies published 2020–2021, which provided empirical evidence of the impact of the pandemic on early career researcher (ECR) activity and development. The search strategy involved (a) online databases (Scopus, Web of Science, and Overton); (b) well-established higher education journals (based on Scopus classification), and (c) references in the retained articles (snowballing). The final sample included 11 papers. PURPOSE. The aim of this paper is to identify the documented effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on ECR activity, development, career prospects, and well-being. FINDINGS. The evidence shows that ECRs have been affected in terms of (a) research activity, (b) researcher development, (c) career prospects, and (d) well-being. Although many negative consequences were identified, some promising learning practices have arisen; however, these opportunities were not always fully realised. The results raise questions about differential effects across fields and possible long-term consequences where some fields and some scholars may be worse off due to priorities established as societies struggle to recover. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS. There is a need for revised institutional and national policies to ensure that sufficient measures are implemented to support ECRs' research work in a situation where new duties and chores were added during the pandemic. ORIGINALITY/VALUE. This paper provides insights into the impacts of the initial societal challenges of the pandemic on ECRs across disciplines that may have long-lasting effects on their academic development and well-being.
  • Rickard Family Fonds, c.1888-1977

    Cameron, Chantal (2022-06-09)
    The fonds consists of material related to the family of George and Cora Rickard and their daughter Mary Linda (Patterson) Eger. The fonds is comprised mostly of photo albums and photographs but also includes personal papers and a book. There are several photographs taken around Niagara, including the Ontario Power House near the base of the Horseshoe Falls; Lundy’s Lane; camping at Chippawa Creek; Queenston Heights Park; and Brock’s Monument.

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