Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHaggart, Blayne
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-05T21:21:59Z
dc.date.available2016-02-05T21:21:59Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.citationHaggart, Blayne (2013) "Fair Copyright for Canada: Lessons for Online Social Movements from the First Canadian Facebook Uprising." Canadian Journal of Political Science 46(4): 841-861.:en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/8246
dc.description.abstractDespite their growing importance, the political effectiveness of social media remains understudied. Drawing on and updating resource mobilization theory and political process theory, this article considers how social media make “political engagement more probable,” and the determinants of success for online social movements. It does so by examining the mainstreaming of the Canadian “user rights” copyright movement, focusing on the Fair Copyright for Canada Facebook page, created in December 2007. This decentralized, grassroots, social media-focused action – the first successful campaign of its kind in Canada and one of the first in the world – changed the terms of the Canadian copyright debate and legitimized Canadian user rights. As this case demonstrates, social media have changed the type and amount of resources needed to create and sustain social movements, creating openings for new groups and interests. Their success, however, remains dependent on the political context within which they operate.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.subjectcopyrighten_US
dc.subjectonline activismen_US
dc.subjectFacebooken_US
dc.subjectsocial movementsen_US
dc.subjectuser rightsen_US
dc.titleFair Copyright for Canada: Lessons for Online Social Movements from the First Canadian Facebook Uprisingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record