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dc.contributor.authorMeldrum, Lindsay S.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-22T18:35:13Z
dc.date.available2013-08-22T18:35:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-08-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10464/4907
dc.description.abstractGrounded in Basic Psychological Needs Theory (Deci & Ryan, 2002), the present investigation examined whether psychological need satisfaction mediated the relationship between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and well-being. Adopting a longitudinal design participants (N= 147) completed questionnaires assessing MVPA, well-being and perceived psychological need satisfaction in exercise contexts on three occasions separated by three weeks. A pattern of small-to-moderate correlations were noted between MVPA and indices of well-being (r12's ranged from .16 to .29). Multiple mediation analysis indicated that perceived psychological need satisfaction mediated the relationship between MVPA and well-being with perceived competence emerging as a unique mediator. Serial mediation analyses indicated the importance of ongoing psychological need satisfaction to well-being. Contexts that afford individuals the opportunity to engage in MVPA, as well as supports their need for competence, would be most advantageous for the promotion of psychological well-being.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBrock Universityen_US
dc.subjectwell-beingen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Determination Theoryen_US
dc.subjectMVPAen_US
dc.subjectmediationen_US
dc.subjectPsychological need satisfactionen_US
dc.titleBasic Psychological Needs as mediators: An examination of the relationship between exercise and well-beingen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Health Sciences Programen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Applied Health Sciencesen_US
dc.embargo.termsNoneen_US


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